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1920s Kitchen Quarry Tiles - Restore or Replace?

Discussion in 'Tiling' started by McAhuna, 7 Mar 2017.

  1. McAhuna

    McAhuna

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    So we are doing the kitchen in our 1928 house.
    Under the old lino we find the original reddish quarry tiles. But they are in bad nick, covered in glue and one or two missing (replaced by concrete).

    It will cost £400-£600 to professionally clean and restore them, but they won't ever be perfect, the concrete gaps will be painted rather than replaced.

    The second option is to buy modern replica quarry tiles and tile them over the top, which won't work out much more expensive. Whilst not original, they will be in keeping with the house character. Only thing is they will be glued over the top of the original tiles (destroying them fortever) and put in using modern grouting, rather than the original 1920s method where they were pressed together.

    Third option is simply forget the original feature and put vinyl floor covering over.

    Any views? Are the 2nd and 3rd options sacrilege/vandalism, etc? or are we being overly sentimental here?
     
  2. OwainDIYer

    OwainDIYer

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  4. McAhuna

    McAhuna

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    We were advised this would risk breaking the adjacent tiles, and the concrete may be covering up some unknown problem.
     
  5. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    Well I'd give replacing the concrete a go.
    Surely if you dedicated some time with a small cutter and a drill bit you could remove the concrete in 4" squares? It would be a pain but it's more effort than expense and if it doesn't work then apply more concrete.

    Using a multi tool that relies on vibration to cut lines will not be too dusty

    Try one test out of sight first.
    Also, if you were really lucky, there may be good tiles that you can steal from under a unit or in a cupboard.
    My mate did this by sourcing the tiles from his understairs cupboard
     
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  7. Lower

    Lower

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    We did this on a victorian hall floor. A decent restorer will be able to replace the missing tiles as ours did.

    However, i think you'll be disappointed with the results. We'd have been better off spending the money on replacing the floor.
     
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