4 core flex to 3 pin plug?

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Hi there

I've bought some 2KW electric convector heaters from Dimplex as my house does not have central heating. They have arrived now however they are not plug in as I expected but just have bare 4 core wire for installing into a fuse spur/switch. Am I able to add a 13A plug onto the end of this cable so I can just plug them in to the mains? I've been told by Dimplex that this is possible although will void the warranty.. My question is what do I do with my spare wire? I've got a Green/Yellow for Earth, a Brown for Live and then 2 Neutrals, one a Blue and the other Black. Do I just tape up the spare neutral? I'm very inexperienced with this kind of thing but also on a tight budget.

Any help would be much appreciated, thanks!
 
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The black is NOT a neutral.
It is a signal wire that is used when several of the heaters are all controlled by a Dimplex controller. It is a 240volt conductor. If you connect it to neutral, or short it out you will kill the heater.
You need to put the end of that wire in a bit of insulated terminal block. Do not trust tape for anything except wrapping up a parcel.

I do not know how many heaters you mean by "some" but you really need to look at the loading on your circuit if they are all going to be plugged in to the same socket ring circuit. Especially if you have other high power items like dryers, washing machines etc on the same circuit.

Usually multiple panel heaters are connected to a separate circuit to avoid overloading.
 
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If it's one of the posher Dimplex heaters the black wire is for external controls, not another neutral...

DO NOT CONNECT THE BLACK WIRE TO EARTH

The heater you've got is not designed to be wired into a plug. Doesn't mean it won't work, though, but as Dimplex say you're on your own with regard to warranty etc.
 
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The black wire is not a neutral it is 'Pilot Wire' and it is used for remote control of the heaters from a central programmer when part of a central heating system.

Regarding whether you should put a plug on or not, I suggest you read this previous thread asking the same question, then you can draw your own conclusion.
 
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Ah ok, I just got the black being neutral from the plugs I bought. I actually wired it up with the blue as neutral but then I decided against plugging it in till I got some advice
 
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The black wire is not a neutral it is 'Pilot Wire' and it is used for remote control of the heaters from a central programmer when part of a central heating system.

Regarding whether you should put a plug on or not, I suggest you read this previous thread asking the same question, then you can draw your own conclusion.

That thread is exactly what I was looking for. I did a bit of searching first but didn't find that so sorry to waste anyone's time.. So if I wire up as mentioned but put the black cable in an insulated block I should be fine?
 
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The black is NOT a neutral.
It is a signal wire that is used when several of the heaters are all controlled by a Dimplex controller. It is a 240volt conductor. If you connect it to neutral, or short it out you will kill the heater.
You need to put the end of that wire in a bit of insulated terminal block. Do not trust tape for anything except wrapping up a parcel.

I do not know how many heaters you mean by "some" but you really need to look at the loading on your circuit if they are all going to be plugged in to the same socket ring circuit. Especially if you have other high power items like dryers, washing machines etc on the same circuit.

Usually multiple panel heaters are connected to a separate circuit to avoid overloading.

These are all going in separate rooms but I guess that doesn't guarantee that the socket rings are different? What's the worst that would happen, I presume it would just trip my fuse board?

Also, there are only 2 2KW heaters, I have 2 more being delivered that are 1KW. Will these need a different amp rating for the plug or will 13A be ok for these too?
 
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My house had only one ring circuit for every socket in the place. (its not like that now!)
But many houses have only one circuit for sockets. Maybe what is written on your fuseboard might give you a clue?
You can't just go adding more and more without thinking about the possible effect. Eventually it will trip the MCB, or blow the fuse.

You say only 2 x 2KW heaters. Bear in mind that a lot of electric kettles are rated at 2KW. There's not problem having one or two of those going as a kettle is only powered for a minute or two. Panel heaters are on for hours...

The information from Dimplex should tell you what size fuse will be needed.
 
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I've bought some 2KW electric convector heaters from Dimplex as my house does not have central heating.
If they're new, surely they must have come with instructions which tell you that the black wire is not Neutral?


I'm very inexperienced with this kind of thing but also on a tight budget.
6kW of electric heating will cost up to 72p/hour to run.


... put the black cable in an insulated block I should be fine?
How will you get one of those into the body of the plug?


will 13A be ok for these too?
Yes.

It's possible that some anal people here will tell you that it's better to use a smaller one. There's no electrical engineering or regulatory justification.
 
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If they're new, surely they must have come with instructions which tell you that the black wire is not Neutral?



6kW of electric heating will cost up to 72p/hour to run.

Yes, but I need heating and this is my only option as I can't afford any upfront costs.

How will you get one of those into the body of the plug?
I guess I won't? What would you suggest?
Yes.

It's possible that some anal people here will tell you that it's better to use a smaller one. There's no electrical engineering or regulatory justification.
Ok, great, thanks
 
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If there is no room in the plug for a small piece of insulated terminal block, an option would be to use heat-shrink sleeving.
But then you'd have to buy some. And a heat gun to shrink it with.
 
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Depends on the model, but if these heaters are intended for pilot wire control as part of a system they might not have any local controls or thermostat, which will make them less convenient to operate (and probably increase running costs as they will be on when not needed).
 
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Depends on the model, but if these heaters are intended for pilot wire control as part of a system they might not have any local controls or thermostat, which will make them less convenient to operate (and probably increase running costs as they will be on when not needed).

They are the Dimplex Q-Rad range and have a control panel with timer options on. Are you saying that if the pilot wire is not included then the the timer panel won't function?
 
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There's two ways to control the heaters.
1. a plug in module in each heater
0r
2. all connected together with a central controller.

In either method the pilot wire is present and has a voltage on it. In option 1 the pilot wire is not connected to anything external to the heater.
 
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