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advice needed - flooring void and a concrete block - removal

Discussion in 'Building' started by ngambit, 21 Nov 2020.

  1. ngambit

    ngambit

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    Hi all,

    I'm replacing a lot of broken floorboards in my kitchen and in one corner of the room there is a concrete block measuring about 1m2 which is rasied above the floor level.

    In my wisdom I removed the concrete only to find that its filled with soil. Theres no bottom to it, I hoped that it would have a concrete bottom layer like the rest of the void but it hasnt, its just soil

    I am ok to leave the soil exposed or should i cover it somehow?

    I am planning on running new joist to the wall to support the new floorboards above there the soil it

    see pictures, hope you can help, cheers :)
     

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  3. personally i’d level it , lay a dpm and concrete it back to the correct level.
     
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  4. ngambit

    ngambit

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    Thank you.

    so bring the bricks which are around the hole level with the floorboards? and fill the hole in with concrete? so the bricks will show (though they will be covered with kitchen units / laminate)

    how thick should the concrete layer be?
     
  5. tel765

    tel765

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    Wrong, simply foolishly wrong and ignorant of building practice to suggest ngambit spends time and money filling concrete back in when he's just spent time and effort taking it out. The Grand Old Duke of York comes to mind?
    Unless responders understand building work then they would do better to remain silent & listen & learn.

    OP,
    you have a suspended floor, and your idea for continuing the suspended floor is a good idea. That way you will have the possibility of air flow under all the floor, and equal level floor boards.
    No need for a new support wall - your new plastic wrapped joist tails can rest in pockets cut out of the brickwork.

    Remove all the soil and concrete and brick remnants down to the surrounding soil level
    and then lay a membrane on the soil (with a 50mm layer of concrete on top of the membrane for belt & braces if you think it necessary).

    Do you have any air bricks - you need air bricks to provide ventilation under the suspended floor.
    The left hand support wall is also blocking free ventilation as is the next (superfluous?) support wall.
    Perhaps a lack of ventilation has caused the damp staining (condensation?) to be seen on the joists?
    Pics showing outside the kitchen at ground level would show any air bricks?
     
  6. ngambit

    ngambit

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    Thanks Tel,

    Ive had most of the floorboards up and have been clearing all the rubble and clearing the air bricks, I did find an air brick bottom left of the picture that was completely blocked, now cleared and can feel the air moving.

    the gap between left hand wall support and the outside wall is blocked with rubble, which I have been clearing as i've gone along

    Another question, how difficult is it to cut pockets in the brickwork, I presume you cut a hole, wrap the joist tail in plastic and fill with mortar?

    Many thanks
     
  7. tel765

    tel765

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    Hi, why not post a pic of where you are now up to - & the external pics?

    Its simple to cut pockets with a brick chisel and hammer ( gloves and glasses) or even a masonry disc in a small angle grinder will bite in 30mm or so - the pockets only have to be the rough joist section size say 75mm deep.
    Only use semi-dry sand and cement - with, if available, bits of slate as packings.

    Clearing the gap is good - no timber should be in contact with masonry or soil without DPC protection.
    As you work probe joistings for soft possibly rotting areas.

    Think ahead at this stage for any pipes or cables you want to run under the floorboards.

    Dont hesitate to ask for any further advice.
     
  8. my idea is better . you could have done it by now .
     
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  9. ngambit

    ngambit

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    benny, can you explain why your idea is better, as i lack the knowledge?
     
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  11. ngambit

    ngambit

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    Tel,

    not much progress I'm afraid, have fmily commitments also.

    Heres some more pictures, I've got about 1 1/2 brick depth to dig out yet

    I've a soil pipe that i need to lower, whats the best way to approach this, cut it down and fill somehow?

    The photo of the airbrick is the one next to the soil pipe, its not quite at ground level due the the patio

    Thanks for your help / advice so far !
     

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  12. Nige F

    Nige F

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    :notworthy:
     
  13. tel765

    tel765

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    Thanks for the last pics - one showing the whole room would also help?

    Cutting the, what seems to be a clay pipe is straight forward enough if you have (or hire) an angle grinder and a stone disc?
    You then measure the OD and get a pipe cap to seal off & prevent fumes or rodents.
    Dont attempt to "fill it" - cap it.

    Air bricks are not supposed to be at ground level - they should be at least one brick course off the ground - and set between joists opposite a joist bay.
    Best practice has air bricks sat on the DPC.
     
  14. it’ll take you an hour at virtually no cost to yourself.
    the timber alternative is dear , time consuming and labour intensive. with little or no benefit. your choice.
    it’s just my opinion . i’m not here to justify it or argue the toss with anybody.
     
  15. tel765

    tel765

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    ngambit,

    Here is the one "hour at virtually no cost" breakdown:

    1. first you have to break out the 1m x 2m x .7m of concrete block.
    2. then dispose of the excess rubble.
    3. journey to a building suppliers & pay for sand, cement and stone.
    4. journey back.
    5. or you can pay more & have ready mixed delivered.
    6. shutter up around the new block - the forms being dead level with the new floor..
    7. mix the concrete outside.
    8. bring in the mix.
    9. wait for the concrete to flash before floating the surface.

    After all that you are back where you started, with costs.
     
  16. Nige F

    Nige F

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    700mm depth of block ?.......already been done ted, do keep up before you start ranting . And keep taking the pills. As a balance would you like to cost the timber and labour for your way ? (.7 m = 27 inches = 2feet3 inches. ):ROFLMAO:
     
    Last edited: 24 Nov 2020
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