Advice on fixing balustrade poles to porcelain tiles (photos inside)?

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Hi all,

I have some stainless posts for a glass balustrade system. The floor is 20mm thick 600x600 porcelain tiles mounted on top of concrete blocks using a full bed of mortar.

The bottom of the pole has three fixing holes.


IMG_20220613_162259.jpg



My original plan was to 'core' out the tile to the diameter of the base and then fix directly to the block underneath. However, the hole will need to be around 120mm diameter and I'm worried this will weaken the tile too much?

My other option is to drill three 14mm holes in the tile and the block underneath - then use some resin (I've found one called Rawlplug R-KEM II resin) to fix in 10mm threaded bar and bolt the posts to the top of the tiles. However, I'm then worried that movement in the posts (wind / people leaning on them etc) may crack the tile?

So, I'm stuck between coring out a large hole in the tile and potentially weakening it or fixing to the top of the tile and potentially cracking the tile if someone leans on it. I would love some advice on this if anyone has any experience or thoughts on it.

Thanks

IMG_20220613_162310.jpg
 

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Use chemical anchors with the proper baskets for the threaded rod, this should then let you avoid almost all the load transfer to the tile since the hole for the basket is fairly large - use a disposable diamond hole cutter.

The chemical anchors themselves are incredibly strong and when you add up all your fixings and plates the force should be distributed.
 
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I don't see what the problem is. You have created a 90 degree return. By doing so you have reduced the risk of someone applying too much pressure to the pole.

I have a similar set up (but with man made decking). I used stainless steel screws from Orbital Fasteners


With my posts the screw heads were counter sunk. A bolt and screw would have pushed the stainless cowl cover further up. Your ones look more generous though (height wise)- meaning that they might be able to accommodate a resin bolt plus nut.
 
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Use chemical anchors with the proper baskets for the threaded rod, this should then let you avoid almost all the load transfer to the tile since the hole for the basket is fairly large - use a disposable diamond hole cutter.

The chemical anchors themselves are incredibly strong and when you add up all your fixings and plates the force should be distributed.

I don't see what the problem is. You have created a 90 degree return. By doing so you have reduced the risk of someone applying too much pressure to the pole.

I have a similar set up (but with man made decking). I used stainless steel screws from Orbital Fasteners


With my posts the screw heads were counter sunk. A bolt and screw would have pushed the stainless cowl cover further up. Your ones look more generous though (height wise)- meaning that they might be able to accommodate a resin bolt plus nut.

Thanks for the advice. I'm going to go with chemical anchors into the blockwork.

I think I'm just over-thinking it. And, after offering up the poles to the slabs I'm convinced it will be fine.

Thanks again :)
 
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Hope it goes well.

Oh, and when you order the toughened glass, don't do what I did. I measured up after having been in the pub. Rather than reducing the glass by 1cm, both left and right, I miscalculated and went for 2cm either side. The glass used to slowly slide down, so I purchased a small sheet of 2mm clear silicone from eBay (and cut it to match the clamp profile . It worked though. The clamping force became sufficient to hold the 2m wide glass.

Oh, and if you plan to cut the stainless threaded studs in situ do not use a diamond blade. Use one of those super thin inox blades. A while back, I used a diamond blade to cut through stainless studs and discovered that it messes up the end of the thread (meaning that you can't put the nut on after). In the end I cut the studs after putting the nuts on.

I guess you could use a scrap of timber as a template with the studs and bolts so that any cuts are in the ground, rather than above ground.
 
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Thanks for that. I've measured out for the glass so hopefully it'll be okay but I'm sure there'll be lessons along the way (there always is with these things).

Cheers :)
 

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