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Advice on Hive units

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Ben2103, 27 Nov 2019.

  1. Ben2103

    Ben2103

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    Hi,

    Looking at purchasing a Hive unit during the Black Friday sales. House currently has a Combi boiler (Ideal Logic) installed but it's more than likely we will be doing some renovations and possibly adding an en-suite or 2nd bathroom in the future. At this point I imagine we will end up with a new heating system. So, am I better off buying the heating only unit or potentially future proofing myself by buying the heat and hot water unit? I know it's possible from reading forum posts that a dual channel receiver can be wired to work with a combi. We tend to use our phones when operating the thermostat so the fact that it has two buttons on the thermostat and receiver when it only needs one doesn't bother me. Just wondered what people's thoughts are please? Is it better to stick to the version you need at the time?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. stem

    stem

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    The Single Channel Hive has one single 'voltage free' contact, so that it can be used with any control voltage (eg 24v, 230V). Both parts of the switching contact are accessible via terminals (1) and (3) so connect 24v to these terminals and it will switch 24v, connect 230V and to them and it will switch 230V. As this version is wired directly to combi boilers it has the voltage versatility they require.

    The Dual Channel Hive is designed for systems with mains voltage external components, such as motorised valves controlling the heating and hot water, so the Hive is connected to them not directly to the boiler. These are always mains operated and so there is no need for a 24v option. As they will only be used on 230V systems one side of the switching contact is permanently connected internally to the Live terminal, this is why Dual Channel Hive can only give a 230V output. Hive Dual Channel can only be used with boilers that have 230V control circuits. It cannot be used with boilers that only have 24v circuits.

    So if your boiler has 230V control circuits you can use the Dual Channel Hive. Some combi's are 230V some are 24v many offer both options. If you wan't someone to confirm which your combi is you will probably need to give the full model type. I believe there are many variants of 'Ideal Logic' out there. Some of which I believe that you have to open up the room sealed part of the boiler to access the wiring terminals. If that's true with yours, it's not a DIY job and should be done by an RGI who can make sure that it's properly sealed up again afterwards.
     
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  4. Ben2103

    Ben2103

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  5. The Novice

    The Novice

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    That’s just the supply needed to power the boiler. From what I can see it doesn’t state if 24 or 230v. @shambolic or @ianmcd may be the best to answer.
     
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  6. stem

    stem

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    I wouldn't normally suggest this for DIY, but I'll make an exception here. Even if your boiler did only have 24v control circuits, then you could use the dual channel Hive 230V to switch a relay and use the voltage free relay contacts for switching the 24v. You would have to be quite electrically competent to do it though, and the relay will need mounting in a box.

    Anyway, hopefully your boiler will have 230V control possibilities lets see first.
     
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  8. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    No need for relay, your boiler has 240v room stat switching
     
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  9. stem

    stem

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    Sometimes it's the right solution sometimes it's not Simples!
     
  10. Ben2103

    Ben2103

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    Thanks ianmcd, in that case it sounds like a dual channel could be configured to work with the boiler using existing wiring and it would future proof any changes?
     
  11. muggles

    muggles

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    It could indeed. So can the Honeywell T6R-HW, and the great advantage of that over Hive is that it is an OpenTherm stat so it'll provide more energy efficient control of your boiler than Hive can. Hive is just an on/off switch with an Internet connection, T6R-HW will use two-way communication between thermostat and boiler to achieve optimum efficiency
     
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  12. Ben2103

    Ben2103

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    Couple of other reasons for going with a Hive such as already having some of their other smart devices. Thanks for all your help. So to conclude, I could go with either option and it can be DIY rather than having to get a RGI in to open up the sealed part of the boiler? Is that correct?
     
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