Advice on POE Security Camera System

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I am looking for a security camera system for my bungalow. I have decided to go for external cameras rather than internal and to avoid having to run power to each camera to use a POE system.
I would prefer 720p resolution to reduce bandwidth and storage of the recorded feeds.
The systems I have looked at so far that are within my budget are Annke and Sannce systems. Having looked at possible camera locations I think I need 6 external bullet type cameras to cover the entrance drive, back door (s) the garage and down the garden. However I think I need an 8 Channel recorder which will give me some limited expansion.

I believe both of these systems will cope with other cameras attached directly to the router if I ran out of physical connections on the recorder as long as there are recording channels left. However a couple of locations including the front door are difficult to get a POE ethernet cable to. Also these cameras may have to be more compact and have different field of vision/focal length than the standard bullet cameras supplied with these systems.
I therefore need to add wireless cameras to the same system.

1) Firstly is there an industry standard I should check for to ensure cameras are compatible with the recorder? For example if I wanted to add a Nest, DLink or other smart camera to the system what network protocol;ls should I check for?

2) Secondly the NVR will be located in my loft alongside my gigabit network switch so I won't be able to view the NVR directly using an attached screen. I therefore need to view over the LAN. However I have read reviews on the above systems and both have iOS and Android apps but some don't work well with modern web browsers relying instead on Internet explorer and Active X Plug in to work. Does anyone have any experience in local viewing via a web browser rather than smartphone app?

3) Finally I would like to install a camera at the bottom of the garden on my garden shed, however its a bit too far for stable wifi and there is no easy way of getting an external ethernet cable to the bottom of the garden. Can I reduce the feed resolution down below 720p and use Powerline Adapters (HomePlugs) on the wire armoured power cable running to the shed. If so what sort of speeds should I buy? Are the TP-link 300Mbps adapters fast enough for video feeds?

Any advice would be appreciated either on the choice of systems or what I am trying to achieve.
Fozzie
 
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I am looking for a security camera system for my bungalow. I have decided to go for external cameras rather than internal and to avoid having to run power to each camera to use a POE system.
I would prefer 720p resolution to reduce bandwidth and storage of the recorded feeds.
The systems I have looked at so far that are within my budget are Annke and Sannce systems. Having looked at possible camera locations I think I need 6 external bullet type cameras to cover the entrance drive, back door (s) the garage and down the garden. However I think I need an 8 Channel recorder which will give me some limited expansion.

I believe both of these systems will cope with other cameras attached directly to the router if I ran out of physical connections on the recorder as long as there are recording channels left. However a couple of locations including the front door are difficult to get a POE ethernet cable to. Also these cameras may have to be more compact and have different field of vision/focal length than the standard bullet cameras supplied with these systems.
I therefore need to add wireless cameras to the same system.

1) Firstly is there an industry standard I should check for to ensure cameras are compatible with the recorder? For example if I wanted to add a Nest, DLink or other smart camera to the system what network protocol;ls should I check for?

2) Secondly the NVR will be located in my loft alongside my gigabit network switch so I won't be able to view the NVR directly using an attached screen. I therefore need to view over the LAN. However I have read reviews on the above systems and both have iOS and Android apps but some don't work well with modern web browsers relying instead on Internet explorer and Active X Plug in to work. Does anyone have any experience in local viewing via a web browser rather than smartphone app?

3) Finally I would like to install a camera at the bottom of the garden on my garden shed, however its a bit too far for stable wifi and there is no easy way of getting an external ethernet cable to the bottom of the garden. Can I reduce the feed resolution down below 720p and use Powerline Adapters (HomePlugs) on the wire armoured power cable running to the shed. If so what sort of speeds should I buy? Are the TP-link 300Mbps adapters fast enough for video feeds?

Any advice would be appreciated either on the choice of systems or what I am trying to achieve.
Fozzie

Hi,

Firstly, what is your budget? I've never heard of either of the manufacturers you have mentioned, but a quick Google and they seem to be generic "CCTV Kit" type systems. I think it's definitely worth going for a reputable brand if your budget will allow, you're also more likely to get some help on here setting the system up.

720p is out of date tech as far as CCTV is concerned these days. It will give you a low-low/medium quality image at best. I'd take the higher quality image and slightly increased storage requirements over squeezing 6 x 720p cams onto a 1TB drive personally, but yes, 720p will use a bit less storage than say, a 2MP IP camera.

ONVIF is the industry standard protocol with regards to using different manufacturers cameras on other NVRs, but it's not rigorously adhered to by any means (it's certainly no guarantee of it working, but there's a fair chance if all of the kit is ONVIF compatible). Varifocal cameras will give you the ability to zoom in/out the image manually at the camera.

Can't comment on the systems you have mentioned, but the Hikvision kit we use at work has a video management software that will run on a PC/Mac for setting up all parameters over the network. Works quite well.

I have run IP cameras over a powerline adapter once or twice, furthest was around 30m with 300mps TP-Link adapters. I had to wind down the bitrate and frame rates of the cameras quite a bit (Hikvision 3MP turrets) but it has been OK from what I've heard. Absolutely not as reliable as CAT5 as I occasionally have to reset my powerline adapters at home (non CCTV use)

Also, be aware that bullet style cameras aren't particularly vandal resistant, especially when mounted low down as in your case.
 
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720p is out of date tech as far as CCTV is concerned these days. It will give you a low-low/medium quality image at best. I'd take the higher quality image and slightly increased storage requirements over squeezing 6 x 720p cams onto a 1TB drive personally, but yes, 720p will use a bit less storage than say, a 2MP IP camera.

It depends a little on what the OP wants to achieve - if you want to be able to read number plates and ID someone with a wide field of view, 720p isn't enough. The image quality of a good 720p camera may outperform a 2MP camera if the sensor is the same size, and will have superior low light performance.

If I were the OP, instead of choosing no-name brands, look on ebay for some used and slightly out of date cameras from Panasonic or Ganz.
 
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Many thanks scott1980 and aptsys for your thoughts and suggestions. Most POE IP systems seem to be 1080p compatible and I am happy to go with that and just get more storage.

Whilst not in the same league as some other systems specified by installers (or even Swann systems) these two makes have some quite good reviews here and here . These cameras are more of a deterrent and to keep an eye on remote areas of the garden. I really don't want to spend more than about £300 plus a bit more for extra storage.

I take your point about bullet cameras but my aim is to get these up at the highest point of the roof on the gable ends. However I can't make out if vertical fixing of the base will allow the cameras to rotate so as parallel with the wall. Most seem to be pictured as horizontal fixing with the base under the soffat for example. Perhaps I need brackets.

Both the two systems mentioned appear to support both ONVIF and PSIA which seems to be the less common standard, so looks like I should be OK with compatibility with other camera makes.
As mentioned the camera for the front door which is in a porch needs to have a fairly short focal length and possibly be mounted on the inside and look through the glass panel over the front door. I was hoping to use some sort of smart camera here to combine with door entry something like but not exactly the RING system which combines with an app to allow remote entry.

from a practical perspective are there do's and dont's about cameras and PIR lighting. I have several PIR operated lights around the building and don't want activation of a light to "Flare Out" the adjacent camera. Are most modern cameras capable of dealing with sudden changes in light or do they take a long while to adjust from pitch black to illuminated.

Before purchasing I will have a look on eBay for some second hand kit.
Fozzie
 
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Just a couple of points.

Most bullet cameras have a very flexible mounting. I have seven of them (Hikvision - wouldn't use anything else after bad experience with cheaper cameras) and they are mounted in a variety of angles.

With a 720p camera mounted high up, and a reasonably wide field of view you will not get much detail - just enough to tell someone is there. Under the soffit is fine but you need access to clean the lens. If it uses infrared lighting it will soon get festooned with spider webs that reflect the light back and block the picture.

If you have the porch camera inside a window you definitely can't use IR. Check that the one you buy allows you to switch it off.

The old saying very much applies to CCTV - Buy cheap, buy twice.
 
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Just a couple of points.

Most bullet cameras have a very flexible mounting. I have seven of them (Hikvision - wouldn't use anything else after bad experience with cheaper cameras) and they are mounted in a variety of angles.

With a 720p camera mounted high up, and a reasonably wide field of view you will not get much detail - just enough to tell someone is there. Under the soffit is fine but you need access to clean the lens. If it uses infrared lighting it will soon get festooned with spider webs that reflect the light back and block the picture.

If you have the porch camera inside a window you definitely can't use IR. Check that the one you buy allows you to switch it off.

The old saying very much applies to CCTV - Buy cheap, buy twice.

Hikvision stuff is cheap...

It's best to avoid anything with IR illuminators. If you must because there is absolutely no ambient light, get a separate IR illuminator.
 
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Hikvision stuff is cheap...

It's best to avoid anything with IR illuminators. If you must because there is absolutely no ambient light, get a separate IR illuminator.

Rubbish.

After the few systems I have installed and having a cheap system myself that I had nothing but problems with I upgraded to a hikvision system. It was anything but cheap and it runs so well I have installed several for other friends and family who are so happy with it.
 
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Thanks all I really do appreciate your comments and suggestions although there are always going to be differing views between contributors :).

I am not looking for a top of the range system neither am I looking for the cheapest I can get. The Sannce and Annke appear to be towards the cheaper end although not the cheapest and Hikvision somewhere in the middle.
Perhaps I would be better building my own NVR from a PC or server and then just buying what cameras I need, possibly Hikvision which are available on eBay. I have lots if second user PC's as I am an IT engineer but most are lower spec and taken away when upgrading a customer. Is this a feasible option? the other expense would be a minimum 8 way POE network hub preferably gigabit if the traffic is 1080p (about £55 for TP-Link) assuming this supports the correct POE protocol for the Hikvision cameras.

However I am still slightly confused with the type of camera. Most off the shelf systems seem to come with dome cameras which I assume are meant for ceiling fixing. As all mine will be outdoor fixed vertically to the apex of the various gable ends these presumably aren't appropriate so I would need bullet cameras? Is this a correct assumption or do the dome cameras come with a bracket for vertical fixing and if so are they still IP66/67 water resistant.

Secondly I am also still unclear about neighbouring PIR external lighting. Clearly I wouldn't point a camera directly at a light but do most cameras recover quickly from dark to illuminated.

Finally for Sally2000 and lamchamps do the Hikvision Bullet cameras come with s single POE connection with a waterproof coupling or are they like the Annke bullet which have both the POE connection and separate power socket in the form of a Y cable. I want to drill a single 20mm hole through the block work to take the connector so its within the wall cavity and not left hanging outside. the Y cable design prevents this.
Many thanks
Fozzie
 
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Rubbish.

After the few systems I have installed and having a cheap system myself that I had nothing but problems with I upgraded to a hikvision system. It was anything but cheap and it runs so well I have installed several for other friends and family who are so happy with it.

Agreed.

Hikvision make some great kit, I have installed a number of Hikvision systems and they are high quality, reliable and offer a wide range of equipment to suit all domestic, commercial and industrial installs.
 
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It depends a little on what the OP wants to achieve - if you want to be able to read number plates and ID someone with a wide field of view, 720p isn't enough. The image quality of a good 720p camera may outperform a 2MP camera if the sensor is the same size, and will have superior low light performance.

If I were the OP, instead of choosing no-name brands, look on ebay for some used and slightly out of date cameras from Panasonic or Ganz.
Sorry cannot find any second user Panasonic Bullet Cameras on eBay that are either external IP66/67 and POE nor any Ganz to the same requirements! the nearest I can find was these from China and they are analogue not IP
 
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Agreed.

Hikvision make some great kit, I have installed a number of Hikvision systems and they are high quality, reliable and offer a wide range of equipment to suit all domestic, commercial and industrial installs.

We've had a quite a few failures, and while they behave better than the cheapest stuff, the hardware design itself leaves a lot to be desired - cheap components and definitely built down to a cost - they're not really any better than the basic stuff on the market other than some better software.

Unfortunately, the WiFi cameras have serious vulnerabilities and allows easy access to the host network to anyone with a laptop.

They're certainly not a good option for commercial where cost is not a factor.
 

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