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Aerial through hip roof

Discussion in 'Audio Visual' started by Donkmeister, 2 Jun 2019.

  1. Donkmeister

    Donkmeister

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    Is there a way to install an aerial through a tile roof, from the inside?

    I would like to be able to swap antenna from time to time (hobby stuff, not TV!) but unfortunately I have a hip roof and rather inaccessible chimney. Is there a solution that involves a one-time installation on the outside but then means I can swap antennae via the loft?

    The only thing I have been able to think of is putting a Dormer window into the roof so I can put a ladder up from the loft through the window.
     
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  3. Lucid

    Lucid

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    Dormer was going to be my suggestion too. The way the tiles and underfelting are layered I can't see a practical way to open up roof on the odd occasion without wrecking the construction.
     
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  4. big-all

    big-all

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    i am 2 miles from reigate transmitter my arieal is in my roof not line off site but in line
    i also have a loop[a bit off bell wire in a loop ]ariel in my shed at the back and the quality off signal is quite close it may be worth checking if a room/house based ariel will give the signal strength and quality required for your situation
     
  5. Lucid

    Lucid

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    I think @Donkmeister said it's not for TV. Maybe the signals being picked up (or broadcast?) are too weak for an in-loft aerial, and that's why the requirement for outdoor rig? That, plus the need to change the aerial from time to time.
     
  6. big-all

    big-all

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    yes off course you may be fully correct ??
    i had gone through the route from the house via coax to the shed via 3 boosters to get a good signal
    but after visiting a freind with just a loop areiel i disconnected the two boosters and the 60ft from the house as the loop ariel worked as well although the signal strength was a bit less
     
  7. Lucid

    Lucid

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    Three boosters!?!

    I really can't stress enough just how overrated signal Strength is. With digital TV signal, Quality is King.
    Get that right and everything else becomes a lot simpler.

    Reigate is a relay for Crystal Palace, and although only running at 2kW, the vertically polarised signal has decent reach. I'm not entirely surprised that the coax itself is enough to help pick up some useable signal. Some recent changes at the transmitter due to the 800- and 700MHz clearances mean that the channels being used now are all in the 21-30 range, so it's a Group A transmitter. People with a standard Wideband High Gain aerial (which is a poor match for Group A) will get a signal but it will be weak and so the Quality will suffer.

    My house is just over 30 miles from the Granada region main transmitter at Winter Hill. It's far more powerful than Reigate. The main muxes all broadcast at 100kW, but despite this the signal prediction sites say that this area needs a high gain aerial with amplification. That's not the case in my town. I'm running an unamplified low gain Log Periodic for DVB-T/T2. I get 95-100% Quality on all the muxes. There's so much signal that I can throw 38dB of attenuation at the signal before I start to get signal break up. That's a huge amount of reduction.

    As long as signal Quality is 80% or more, then signal Strength somewhere in the region of 30-40% ('Good' if your TV's signal metering uses words rather than numbers) is plenty to ensure good stable reception in a lot of cases.
     
  8. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Why not put two aerials up and swap connection inside loft when needed?
     
  9. Donkmeister

    Donkmeister

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    You got it - fortunately for TV I've got line of sight to Sandy Heath so am on the verge of needing attenuators!

    This is for stuff like ADS-B transmissions - from my current antenna position I get great signal in one direction but am in the shadow of houses in the other hence wanting to put something up high. I tend to muck about with antennae fairly regularly.

    I may have to accept I can either do it once and leave it, or retain the ability to play with antennae but have reduced coverage!
     
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  11. big-all

    big-all

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    the reason for three boosters was about 35years ago had a booster to give a decent signal to the main tv and video recorders
    the signal from the videos then went to the whole house via another booster with the shed [workshop] added some time later needed another booster being another 60foot away
     
  12. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    For ADS-B I just use an antenna on an hooked bracket, with a length of 20mm plastic conduit as an handle at the bottom, the antenna is tiny. I can lean out of a window and just hook the assembly onto my guttering, coax in through the window, to my receiver and PC. House is at a local high spot, north /west Yorks border and it picks up out to Ireland, well out to the North Sea, middle of Scotland and almost down to London - depending on aircraft altitude.

    I have various other AR antennas up, including long wire for HF, 2m/70cms, and amateur TV accessible via a Velux window. A mast is pivoted at the base, and bracketed at the top - release the top bracket and the top lowers to the ground. Another way would be to devise a light weight telescoping wind up mast. It doesn't need to be that robust for such a tiny antenna. These are often used to avoid planning permissions.
     
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  13. Lucid

    Lucid

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    Ah... For those times when you have to let Gatwick know that your house is on final approach ;) :D
     
    Last edited: 3 Jun 2019
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  14. Donkmeister

    Donkmeister

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    That's brilliant! I have an eight element colinear that I built for ADS-B and I can get aircraft out over the North Sea, beyond Gt Yarmouth (I'm near the Beds/Cambs border), but back toward the SW get very little due to man-made obstacles.
    You're getting a similar range with a much smaller antenna lol
     
  15. Lucid

    Lucid

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    35 years ago... analogue era. That probably explains it then.

    Though before my time being involved with aerials, from what I understand, analogue was a bit more dependent on signal level for quality. It didn't have the equivalent digital cliff (or wall, I guess) for maximum signal level that DVB-T/T2 has.

    A fair number of installs in the analogue and switch-over period had a lot of amplification. Once DSO was complete and the DVB-T transmission powers were ramped up then those same installs found that they had too much signal.

    What I find amplification most useful for is to compensate for signal losses down cable where passive splitting isn't an option.
     
  16. winston1

    winston1

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    What sort of frequencies are ADS-B transmissions? Would it not be possible to have an aerial on a rotator controlled from inside?
     
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