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Amateur DIY Extension

Discussion in 'Your Projects' started by VDubDan, 30 Apr 2019.

  1. VDubDan

    VDubDan

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    Concrete Pour

    So, the concrete. In short - it didn't go great. I recorded a video and everything, but in light of what I'm going to write I've not edited or posted it. But I think it's only right to include what goes wrong on these project write-ups too.

    Due to various conflicting schedules and such, I was basically stuck by myself for the concrete pour. I had nobody to help me, and I was very conscious of the trench being left open for too long especially as the top of the trench was (and is) very crumbly. Because of this, I decided to speak to a few local concrete firms about pumping and while it was fairly expensive, it seemed like a sensible solution.

    So, I enlisted Local Firm A who assured me confidently that they'd come and pump the concrete get it to height and I wouldn't have to touch a thing while they were there. Sounds ideal for a DIYer on their own, hey!

    Well, the whole day was a s**t show really. They were many hours late due to some issue with a truck somewhere (I know that's not their fault really), but I think they turned up at past 4pm with several other jobs still to go. One of the guys was wearing sandals, which didn't exactly fill me with confidence.

    Anyway, I told them to bring it to just about rebar height and for whatever reason the guy struggled with getting the pump shut off with his remote control thing. It probably didn't help that he'd decided to position himself and work around the worst bit of the crumbly bits.

    Even standing well back it was clear we were well over - I tried to get some out with a shovel, but it was an exercise in futility really and I started to worry I was going to end up in the trench! So all I could do was tamp it the best I could.

    To be absolutely honest, I felt damned deflated after this but all we can do is fix forward!

    And hey, I've got a trench full of concrete! End result was it was about 30-40mm over where it should be



     

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  2. VDubDan

    VDubDan

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    Initial Drainage Work

    I decided to make a bit of a start on the underground drainage. For two reasons, really - one to get over my fear of cutting up clay pipe by "getting it over and done with" and two, to make it easier to ensure my drains can get through my foundations at the right height. And of course the best thing about DIYing your own project is you can just pick the bits you fancy doing on a given day!

    Being an old 30's house, we had an old trap (That seemed to be leaky) connected to some clay pipe. I dug back hoping to find the soil pipe connection, but I imagine that's under the garage.

    Anyway, not very exciting work - I used a 9" grinder to cut the clay (I did some practice cuts further up first!) which went through like butter. Then used a flexible clay -> 110mm coupling.

    I then switched to my 4" grinder for cutting the plastic pipe and making a chamfer. To make the "backfill" in the new gully I had to buy a 110mm hole saw, and I used solvent weld to put in a short length of 110mm pipe. Hopefully, that works out!

    Pics here: https://imgur.com/a/Ed5rhUF


    (The downpipe 'connection' is, of course, temporary. At some point I need to drop a new piece of downpipe in and a nice rubber bung into the 110mm)
     

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  3. SamSelfBuildMcr

    SamSelfBuildMcr

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    Hi Dan,
    I'm following your thread with interest. I am also doing a self build extension. I'm further on than you it appears, approx 2000mm above ground now.
    It's been a massive learning curve for myself, so many questions and dilemas along the way. Will you be doing the brickwork yourself too?
     
  4. VDubDan

    VDubDan

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    Nice one! And yes, as the adage goes - you don't even know what you don't know. I think my problem is I'm an "expert" in my field and I find not having a deep knowledge of something very hard, and then I find myself in analysis paralysis or panicking I've done the wrong thing and BCO are going to have a fit!

    Yes, I'm doing the brickwork, literally just started the brickwork last weekend! Hoping to make some real progress now
     

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  5. Ian H

    Ian H

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    An excellent choice of gully and great write up. I like that’s your including the good and bad (y)
     
  6. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Yup, had both of those numerous times. Now you know why a builder adds in some cost for contingency.

    Of course the bigger building companies will get a better service -a rrgular customer will always get priority, you can sure they get the 8.am slots
     
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