Best training and accreditation for someone entering electrical trade

Joined
6 Sep 2011
Messages
22
Reaction score
1
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
I am trying to help my friend to change his career path to become an electrician. He spent a fair amount of time laying and modifying wiring in other counties, however, he does not have a formal qualification (yes, not ideal, but I think the work was inspected and signed off by electrician). Working as a handyman, electrical work is often required and he sometimes has to turn customers down, due to lack of qualification.

Saying this he knows about wiring and testing, including understanding of UK wiring system (power supply and lighting), but is looking to undertake an electrician training and obtain professional accreditation to be able to modify and lay new electrical installations, lights, connect hobs and maybe replace consumer units.


Could you please suggest what is the best route and training for him to undertake?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
30 Jun 2008
Messages
14,682
Reaction score
1,503
Location
Suffolk
Country
United Kingdom
A lot will depend on your friends age. If he is young, (20-30) he will have a much better chance of finding someone to possibly take him on as an electricians mate, whereas someone in their 50's would probably find it a bit harder.
You say he has done a fair bit in other "counties", do you mean counties in this country or should it have been "other countRies"? If so it would depend in which countries he has worked as their systems may be totally different to ours.
Contact your local job center to ask if they can advise the best route to take and what help may be available.
 
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
38,293
Reaction score
4,630
Location
Retired to:
Country
Portugal
Saying this he knows about wiring and testing, including understanding of UK wiring system (power supply and lighting),
To be truthful, if that is really the case, then he just needs to know the regulations.
There is no formal qualification required to do electrical work in the UK.

but is looking to undertake an electrician training and obtain professional accreditation to be able to modify and lay new electrical installations, lights, connect hobs and maybe replace consumer units.
As above, again.
If he wants to avoid the need to involve the Local Authority for notifiable work - new circuits, replacement CUs, and alterations and additions within the zones of bathrooms etc. - then he just needs to be registered with one of the self-certification (more correctly self-notification) schemes.

So - it just depends how competent he is already.
 
Joined
6 Sep 2011
Messages
22
Reaction score
1
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
In other countries, outside of the UK. Pixies travel on copper the same way in every country, so I guess it's only how each country regulates this movement, hence the question on what training to take to understand those regulations.
Does he have to be a "mate" of an electrician and is there a regulation to stipulate that an electrician can only be called an electrician after spending 200h with an older electrician? Or is it just easier to get the "eldest" to learn?

He is in his forties and I know he is more than capable to do the work, but is lacking certification and adjustment of regulations to what is required in the UK.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
6 Sep 2011
Messages
22
Reaction score
1
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
As above, again.
If he wants to avoid the need to involve the Local Authority for notifiable work - new circuits, replacement CUs, and alterations and additions within the zones of bathrooms etc. - then he just needs to be registered with one of the self-certification (more correctly self-notification) schemes.

So - it just depends how competent he is already.
Could you please let me know what is required to be registered as a self-certified professional?
 
Joined
30 Jun 2008
Messages
14,682
Reaction score
1,503
Location
Suffolk
Country
United Kingdom
No he doesn't have to be a mate but sometimes an older/more qualified guy will be able to teach him 'on the job' so to speak rather than sitting in a classroom doing theory or going with a general builder who may teach him the wrong way. I have recently taken a part time job at a holiday village doing something totally outside my remit. Now they can see what my work is like I have just been interviewed for a position more suited to my skills. There was an end to my means. You can tell someone you are an expert at something but if they don't take you on for whatever reason then start lower down the tree and prove your worth.
 
Joined
27 Jan 2008
Messages
19,510
Reaction score
1,857
Location
Llanfair Caereinion, Nr Welshpool
Country
United Kingdom
Until quite late in my working life, I lacked collage qualifications, I moved from being an auto electrician which I did have collage paperwork for, to working on mains, will not say higher voltage as some trucks do use high voltage, but I did not do much work on trucks like the electro haul, but I moved across slowly to doing industrial electrical work, and there is no formal qualification, but I had during my career attended many courses to do many specialised parts of the trade.

Around 2000 I decided to do a set of three collages courses which were run one after the other spanning the year, one was on the regulations, one how to test and inspect in-service electrical equipment and last one how to test and inspect installations. They were all done as night classes and were 3 hours a week, for in total 24 weeks, I in real terms learnt very little, but I did have four bits of paper to show to some extent I have the knowledge.

OK also have loads of certificates for a wide range of things from using Hawk glands to pre-heating and stress relief, which I have collected over the years, today also have a degree in electrical and electronic engineering, however the three night class courses is likely the most useful in showing I have the skill required. They did teach me that there were one or two things I was getting wrong, but in the main it was not what I learnt but the ability to show some academic qualifications.

The court case over the death of Emma Shaw resulted in firms being far more careful that they can show their staff are qualified for the work being done, it is a pass the buck exercise, if some one other than the firm your working for has said you can do the job, then if some thing goes wrong they can point the finger else where. However in real terms we all make mistakes, and alzheimer's disease means just because you could do the job last year does not mean you can still do it this year.

This has raised its head with driving, just because you have a government issued licence does not mean firms do not need to assess if a personal has the skill to transport their employees, specially in anything larger than a small private car. And I have been required many times to do a driving course before being allowed to drive company cars.
 
Sponsored Links
Top