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Best way to meet decking boards over a joist (cut at 90 deg or 45 deg)

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by ray.birch, 29 Jun 2018.

  1. ray.birch

    ray.birch

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    Due to an unfortunate mishap where I managed to burn a hole 3 decking boards wide in my decking, I'm having to replace a small section (inconveniently right in the middle of the deck!).

    I'm OK with replacing the joist that has also been burnt through, but my question is how best to cut the boards back to the next good joist.

    Perhaps the picture can explain this better, but essentially, should I cut the deck boards at 45 degrees and butt these up flush (the original owners who put the deck in seem to have done this) or just cut at 90 degrees and butt up flush?

    I'm happy with either (I have a plunge saw and a mitre saw so am reasonably confident that either will be accurate enough), but I'd like to know what's best?

    Many thanks all!!

    Decking Joist Cut Query.png
     
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  3. Brigadier

    Brigadier

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    Personally, I'd cut at 90 degrees, so that you do not have a sharp edge / point which could be more easily damaged.
     
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  4. phatboy

    phatboy

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    45 degrees, and then wood glue in the join, pushing the old and new piece nice and tight together. After a few months the join becomes almost invisible!
     
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