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Blocked 10 mm radiator pipes

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by PaulNorthEast, 12 Aug 2019.

  1. PaulNorthEast

    PaulNorthEast

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    Hi,
    My house was built in 1998/99 and most of the radiators are not working or only partially working. I've spoken to a friend who suggested that the 'at-the-time newly invented' plastic 10mm pipe in that sort of time didn't contain an appropriate shield to stop air getting through and hence the pipes are corroding from the inside and getting blocked.
    We did try ramming the pipes with welding rods and managed to re-instate some flow but it was very much a short term fix.
    We are now looking at replacing the pipework to 11 radiators plus fitting a new boiler in the utility and tank upstairs in the airing cupboard as everything is just full of crud even after numerous cleans and flushes.
    Is this a well known problem with the early plastic pipework?
     
  2. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    No never heard of it, but I suspect it is the radiators which have corroded and it is that corrosion which is now blocking the plastic pipes, rather than the pipes corroding. Was there ever any corrosion inhibitor in the system?
     
  3. nwgs

    nwgs

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    Your friend is saying that your house doesn’t have barrier pipe. It’s not a common occurrence, but some early plastic pipe had no barrier built in.
     
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  4. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    as @nwgs correctly says , it sounds like your installer has used non-barrier pipe, this was for use on cold and hot water services but not CH installations, if you have any exposed sections of the pipe used it should be stamped barrier, replacing with proper barrier and adding inhibitor is your only proper solution
     
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  5. dilalio

    dilalio

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    But we have!
     
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  6. gas112

    gas112

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    many many estates were done in it
     
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  7. jeff the gasman

    jeff the gasman

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    Usually builds up on steel inserts in my experience.
     
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  8. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    INSERTS ???? oops :LOL::LOL::LOL:
     
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  9. OLLIE20

    OLLIE20

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    Plastic pipework barrier or not is prone to blockages in heating systems. Any flexible pipework is far more likely to become restricted by dirty systems than copper pipework is. I would urge you to replace the system with copper pipework. It is more work and harder work for,installer and requires a higher skill level than plastic and will tend to cost you a bit more but it's a far better Job than plastic pipework when both are done properly. It will last longer the joints are highly unlikely to leak in the future and it will withstand dirt within a system far better than plastic. Personally I only ever use plastic pipework on heating as a very last resort.
     
  10. gasbanni

    gasbanni

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    There's whole estates where this has happened, non barrier big problem. That's why barrier pipe was introduced.

    If you don't replace it it will build up again. Replacement in my opinion is the best option plastic barrier pipe will be fine it will save a lot of time and expense.

    Hopefully you haven't got chipboard floors !!!!
     
  11. OLLIE20

    OLLIE20

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    I've ripped out thousands of meters of plastic pipework blocked solid loads of which is barrier. Yes copper blocks but but far far less if you imagine the amount of copper systems fitted in comparison to plastic and the length of time the copper was put in before plastic was even invented copper is undoubtably the best option for heating pipework in houses.

    I'm giving you the benefit of what I see over years and years. Some people install some people do service and repairs some professionals do certain types of work more than others one guys 2 months experience can be another guys years worth.

    If you a repiping the whole house with the upheaval that brings there is not a time served experienced heating installer/ engineer who would suggest anything other than copper for performance and longevity.

    For price and ease then maybe they suggest plastic as it keeps the cost of your job down which means they win the job if you're that way inclined. Plastic fittings actually cost a bomb but the fact you can pull it through places without havering to lift boards by fishing it , leaving it un clipped unsupported etc makes the job quicker than copper, but certainly not better.
     
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