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Breaking up concrete - proper technique?

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by robmorgan, 31 Mar 2009.

  1. robmorgan

    robmorgan

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    Hi all,

    I recently pulled down our garage in order to reclaim the garden and am now left with a fiendish 24ft x 10ft x 6" thick slab of concrete to break up and remove.

    I bought an 18kg breaker having been advised it would be up to the task. I've just had a go and progress is demoralisingly slow. I've done maybe a square foot in about half an hour.

    The concrete I'm dealing with has stones / hardcore mixed in with it. Is that normal and should the breaker be able to deal with it? The chisel is starting to look blunt already!

    The breaker came with a flat and a point chisel. I've been using the flat one so far. Under what circumstances should I use one or the other?

    Is there a "proper" technique? I mean, should I be chipping away a sliver at a time, inch by inch, or should I try and carve out a decent sized slab and prise it up?

    Any pointers would be greatfully received... Perhaps it's just the wrong tool for the job and I should hire something more heavy duty?

    Thanks,

    Rob
     
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  3. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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    :confused: sorry couldnt resist :D
    maybe you should go for a heavier breaker!
     
  4. breezer

    breezer

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    no use th pointed one, it applies the same pressure in a smaller area so it breaks it up.

    have you not seen a JCB* breaking up the motorway? although the thing on the end is big, its still round and pointed

    [​IMG]

    * other brands of back hoe excavators are available
     
  5. robmorgan

    robmorgan

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    Ah, that might help (as would a JCB!), I'll give it a try, thanks.

    What's the flat one for?
     
  6. noseall

    noseall

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  8. mikric

    mikric

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  9. Thermo

    Thermo

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    as noseall says you need a bigger breaker for a start. On thick slabs we normally stitch a line of holes across the slab in chunks about 1-2 feet wide. that will ause it to crack and then you can lift it up with a decent pry bar. Once you get the technique its quite easy. Just listen for that satisfying change of tone when the concrete cracks as you drill through it
     
  10. joe-90

    joe-90

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    Thermo's method sounds good. Can you use an sds drill to make the perforations?
     
  11. Thermo

    Thermo

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    not if you want to get the concrete up before your pushing up daisys!
     
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