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bricking up a door.

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by bigdek, 7 Feb 2010.

  1. bigdek

    bigdek

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    i need o brick up my existing kitchen door to the outside and install french doors in the living room.

    spoke to council and they say i need a building warrant .

    i have done the drawings and they say the drawings are ok but i need o write on them the method of how the door will be bricked up to meet current regs and u values.

    is a 1930 bungalow type with brick cavity walls. .

    can someone help and tell me the method and materials used and what i need to write on the drawings

    thanks
     
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  3. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Firstly, have the LA asked for any details/calculations for any new lintels/beams you're inserting in providing the new french doors to the living room? The doors need to comply with current u-values and be safety marked (i.e. BS 6206) as the glass would need to be toughened, which in the majority of cases would be anyway. And... the door would either need to be installed by an approved person/company (FENSA) or a Building Regulation application would cover that, which may make more sense.

    As for bricking up the existing kitchen door. The infill would need to meet current u-values (0.35 W/m2K). So a typical wall make-up could be...

    - 103mm facing brickwork
    - 90mm cavity (50mm clear, 40mm Celotex)
    - 100mm blockwork (Celcon Standard)
    - 13mm wet plaster

    Do you know the existing cavity wall width as with it being a 1930's house, the above wall make-up would most likely be wider than your current wall width. I'm guessing your existing wall would be around 250mm wide?
     
  4. bigdek

    bigdek

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    existing window getting cut down for french door so lintel ok

    being fitted my brother in law who does it for a living.

    existing cavity wall is 300mm

    thanks for your help
     
  5. Chukka63

    Chukka63

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    i think its a joke when BC want modern day spec on older buildings like yours.a new extension yes,but a doorway???.
     
  6. inspector01

    inspector01

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    1930's cavity wall will probably be 50mm cavity. Offer to top the loft insulation up and the BCO should be happy with the infill being the same as the existing. If he IS asking for it to be modern standards it should achieve 0.3w/m2k. Given you wall thickness, 100mm facebrick, 75mm dritherm 32 batt and 75mm lightweight inner leaf block
     
  7. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Well yes... 0.3 would be acceptable but I didn't think the reg's changed that much from Hampshire to Buckinghamshire. It is and has been 0.35 for a while :p
     
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  9. bigdek

    bigdek

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    submitted my drawings and finally heard from the LA yesterday

    few things to add to ammended drawings and i need some assistance again.


    this is verbatim from the letter

    1. Fire. confirm method of closing cavity

    2 . Environment . show position of vertical and horizontal damp proof courses.

    3. Environment . confirm trickle ventilation to lounge

    4. Safety . there appears to be more than 600mm from cill to ground level. please show full compliance with standard 4.4.

    5. Safety . confirm going of proposed steps..


    any help in deciphering this appreciated


    my questions are.

    1. what is the method of closing the cavity

    2. never heard of vertical dpc

    3. what is trickle ventilation . no vents on my current windows (should there be ?)

    4. i have no clue on this

    5. there will be 3 steps going down to a slabbed area these are on the drawing. what else do they want to know. ?
     
  10. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    1. I don't know why they have asked for a fire barrier within the cavity? :rolleyes:

    2. Horizontal DPC's (e.g. Hyload) have to be positioned a min. 150mm above ground level. Vertical DPC's are to be positioned within window/door jambs and can be combined with a cavity closer (e.g. Thermabate).

    3. I would check the requirements for trickle ventilation because if memory serves me correctly, Part F did ask for trickle ventilation to be provided to new windows/doors from 1st October 2006. However, I'm sure there has since been an amendment, which asks for the situation to not be made worse (i.e. if a window/door had trickle ventilation then the new requires it and if it didn't have it before, then there's not a requirement to provide it).

    4. I'm not sure what they're referring to... maybe something to do with toughened glass in critical locations?

    5. The rise/going need to comply with Part K so they are asking for the going depth.
     
  11. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    Closing the cavities around the whole perimeter of the new opening may be required, refer to Part B Section 6 - 6.3 page 35. Unless you have sturdy timber door frames, which may satisfy BC, you can get fire resistant thermabates or similar as mentioned by devilworshipper.
    BC may ask for a stepped dpc above the new doorway.
    BC should only be interested in the steps if they form an essential role in the way the building works, ie if they are part of your landscaping and the house can still function without the stairs they do not need to comply. Having said that it would be prudent and sensible if they did comply.

    The question is though, is blocking up a doorway considered new thermal element or replacement thermal element? I would err towards replacement myself so would agree with Devillover.
     
  12. bigdek

    bigdek

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    are building regs online anwhere so i can see what regulation 4.4 is ?
     
  13. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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