1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Building/Party wall regs for the thickness of a party wall

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by tfish, 5 Feb 2014.

  1. tfish

    tfish

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Is there a minimum thickness required for a party wall?

    Iv got a flat where the party wall is just timber frame and plasterboard.

    Its terrible for noise.

    I can't seem to find a thickness requirement when the party wall construction is timber frame.



    Thanks.
     
  2. tony1851

    tony1851

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    9,194
    Thanks Received:
    1,374
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    How old is the flat?
     
  3. Architexeter

    Architexeter

    Joined:
    25 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    160
    Thanks Received:
    31
    Location:
    Devon
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Read through Part E of the building regulations. As Tony is asking, the age of the the flat will dictate the regulation at the time it was built as Part E was significanlty 'upgraded' about 10 years ago.

    Ideally it would have two separate walls with an airspace between. See Part E on the planning portal, there are some useful diagrams. Including specific detailing at wall to floor junctions.

    If you are looking for a simple fix with minimal loss to room size, I would look to use resillient bars, acoustic quilt and soundbloc plasterboard.

    Hope that helps.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. jeds

    jeds

    Joined:
    16 Apr 2004
    Messages:
    4,085
    Thanks Received:
    526
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    There is no minimum thickness. As Tony says regs are determined by when the building was submitted for building regs. If it is a developer building that could be years before the place was actually built. Modern regs prescribe either a maximum sound level or what's known as a robust detail. If the property is relatively recent you need to find out which method was used? If it's more than, say, 10 years old then you might as well start researching what you can do to sort the problem yourself.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. tfish

    tfish

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Its a old stone built house converted into flats about 15 years ago.

    The bedroom too small to thicken or even add anything to the wall.

    Iv spoken to the landlord who owns the flat next door and he is unwilling to pull the wall down and start again.

    Building Controls dont want to know either.

    I can't lodge a noise complaint as it isn't 'violent' noise.

    Its a bit of a nightmare as I can hear the bloke (whose head must be 2 foot from mine) farting and even breathing at night.
     
  6. jeds

    jeds

    Joined:
    16 Apr 2004
    Messages:
    4,085
    Thanks Received:
    526
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sounds like a trip down the estate agents.
     
  7. tfish

    tfish

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    What about Human Rights & every home owner/tenants right to 'Right To Quiet Enjoyment‎'

    There must be a legal angle to take here?
     
  8. tony1851

    tony1851

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2012
    Messages:
    9,194
    Thanks Received:
    1,374
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    'Quiet' is a relative term.

    If the noise was particularly loud, and/or at unreasonable hours, the environmental health dept. of your council would probably be able to help, though this can be a long process. But from what you describe, the council would most likely not regard it as serious enough.

    While people can sympathise with your predicament, most would say that living in flats and adjoining houses does result in some noise intrusion.
    Detached houses would be the ideal, if only we could all afford one!
     
  9. Architexeter

    Architexeter

    Joined:
    25 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    160
    Thanks Received:
    31
    Location:
    Devon
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The legal angle would be to look at it as a statutory nuisance but as Tony says this is subjective.
     
  10. arkie

    arkie

    Joined:
    4 Feb 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Thanks Received:
    5
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You could take down the plasterboard on your side and use resillient bars, acoustic quilt if you can but just replacing with soundbloc plasterboard would i think have a good effect.
     
  11. tfish

    tfish

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Thanks Received:
    6
    Country:
    United Kingdom
     
  12. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page