Can you mix oil based paints?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Arbu, 10 Jul 2011.

  1. Arbu

    Arbu

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    I need to repaint a sash window. It has painted shutters which are in good order and don't need repainting. I'd like to keep the sash windows the same colour as the shutters. The difficulty is that I don't know exactly what colour paint was used previously. So I've given the window frame one coat in Dulux pure white gloss. But that looked too white. So I left it for 19 hours and started repainting in Leyland Antique White. That looks too yellow, AND the paint has started bubbling up in places. So a bit of a disaster.

    I would next try mixing the two paints to get the colour I want, but the fact that the Leyland paint has reacted so badly when being painted over the Dulux paint suggests to me that this might not be a good idea.

    So what's the best thing to do? I could probably accept the Antique White colour if necessary. Do you think that if I give the Dulux coat longer, say a week, to dry and then paint over with the Leyland paint it won't bubble up? Or should I look for some Dulux paint that's closer to the colour I want?
     
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  3. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Always better not to mix.

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  4. Arbu

    Arbu

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    I've mixed water based paints before and that has been fine. But I'm not sure that it would work with oil-based paints because the oil base may be different. So I guess I'll just leave the first coat plenty of time to dry and then paint in Antique White Leyland.
     
  5. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Did you do any prep and apply an undercoat before the gloss.

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  6. Arbu

    Arbu

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    I sanded it down and applied an undercoat, but I only applied the undercoat where bare wood was showing.
     
  7. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Well the bare areas should have been knotted and primed before undercoating, sand the woodwork well with 120 grit and undercoat the entire surface allow to dry and lightly sand and dust off, with luck then you can apply your gloss and have no further problems.

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  8. Arbu

    Arbu

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    Sorry, just checked, it was primer that I used rather than an undercoat. I wasn't aware of the difference. And there were no knots showing. They didn't advise to use an undercoat when I bought the paint, although now that I look on the Dulux tin I see that this is recommended. Do you still think I should sand it all down before applying another coat?
     
  9. TheDec

    TheDec

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    If the primer you applied was a primer/undercoat you could use this as your second undercoat, if however it was a specific wood primer you should not use it as an undercoat.

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  11. Arbu

    Arbu

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    It's just a Primer. I'll give the existing coat a few days to dry then try the Antique White. If that then goes on OK, fine. If not then I'll have to sand it all down and apply an undercoat, as you say.
     
  12. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Arbu

    If you dont apply the undercoat first the probability will be that your gloss will again fail.

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  13. Arbu

    Arbu

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    The Dulux (white) paint is gloss. It hasn't failed. The Leyland (Antique White) paint is oil based Eggshell. That's what's failed. I think I'd be best sanding down the Leyland that I've applied and going back to the store for some Dulux paint in the colour that I want.
     
  14. Arbu

    Arbu

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    OK, I've spent about two and a half hours sanding the frame down. Quite a job because the paint wasn't entirely dry in places under the surface even after two days, so bits of paint stuck together. So the surface isn't great, but hopefully if I reprime the whole thing, then lightly sand that down as you suggest, then paint two coats of paint, it should look OK.
     
  15. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Hang on I dont know if i'm confusing you or your confusing me, oil based paints can take anywhere up to 3 or 4 weeks to fully cure, leave the window be and allow the paint system to cure before you attempt either any more prep or re-painting, and dont use a specific wood primer as an undercoat.

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  16. Arbu

    Arbu

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    Well I've reprimed the whole thing and it seems to have gone on fine, just a little bit rough where the previous coat hadn't sanded down well because it wasn't fully dry.

    So it seems best to me to leave the primer coat for a few weeks to fully dry, then sand that down with a fine sandpaper to get a smoother finish, then paint two coats over that with the paint I've now got, which is Dulux Satinwood.

    The instructions for Dulux Satinwood don't mention any undercoat and nor did the assistant at Leyland Paints where I bought the paint. Do you really think an undercoat is necessary?
     
  17. TheDec

    TheDec

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    Satinwood is self undercoating and for interior use only.

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