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Coach House / FOG query

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by BlackCat3, 20 Sep 2020.

  1. BlackCat3

    BlackCat3

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    Hi :) so does this mean that any concrete planks would sit unsupported over the empty spaces where the car ports are, and be along the shortest width of the house? What are they held up by?

    Ie in the picture I posted, I have in effect put the tank potentially over one concrete plank if they run front to back rather than along the length of the house.

    I've put a pic of the floor plan and noted the positioning of the current tank, where I was planning to put any new, larger tank. I've also noted where I would really like it to go but didn't think that would work structurally. And then put some queries on the direction of any planks. I would really like to go for the 325 ltr but I'm just not sure of that weight...

    Also, how thick are the planks? I'm assuming the 1200mm is length, 200mm is width, what do you think the depth is? Ie inch thick, 6 inches....
    20200924_203539.jpg
    Thanks (sorry for all the questions!).
     
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  3. maxum

    maxum

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    Sorry, wasnt very clear, the planks are 1200mm width, 200mm thick, length to suit. The longest unsupported span ive worked on has been around 10m. Concrete floors are used for dire resistance, so I doubt you have a timber joist floor
     
  4. BlackCat3

    BlackCat3

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    Ah I see, thanks.

    In your experience, what is beneath the concrete planks? What supports them? And is there anything underneath whatever that might be?

    Trying to build a picture of what the layers of flooring may be made of. The hall cupboards definitely have just visible concrete - I wasn't in when the carpet was removed and the laminate added so not sure of the lounge. Or the bedrooms, but it would be relatively straightforward to peel up some of the carpet. Easier than taking the laminate up anyway.

    Thank you
     
  5. maxum

    maxum

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    Because the planks are prestressed there will be nothing underneath them, they will just be supported at each end, with the end planks having one side sitting on the end wall as well. Your floor will be a cement and sand screed to give a flat and level floor. The ceiling in the garage in my experience will be either fire resistant boards or plasterboard fixed to a suspended ceiling frame or timber battens fixed to the underside of the planks.
     
  6. BlackCat3

    BlackCat3

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    The carports have a white plastic-y looking sort of ribbed covering on the external ceiling?

    Hmm. So with the concrete planks used in your experience (and I know you are not saying this is the case for my property, don't worry) I still don't know how to guage what loading per square foot they have been rated for. Would they take a 700lb odd static weight safely?

    I'm crap at maths and can't work out the loading per sq ft. Tank footprint is 130 x 50 x 50 cm, 325ltr capacity. Fully loaded weight as above, plus presumably the weight of the actual glass (10mm) and the purpose supplied cabinet.

    I also understand that deflection in the floor is potentially the biggest issue, as that could cause tank seams or glass to break should there be deflection and therefore torsional twisting of the tank.

    I have been bouncing about (literally , the cats think I've lost it) in the corner which holds the 185 ltr tank and the two smaller 32ltr tanks, plus the sideboard and the sofa which is about 3ft away. There is no sign whatsoever of any movement from the floor or walls, no bouncy or spongy feeling underfoot, no movement of any hung pictures. Does this possibly mean that deflection issues would not be a problem?
     
  7. conny

    conny

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    As said, the concrete 'planks' are prestressed and will contain steel rods, called re-bar, to give them extra strength.
    Your tank will be perfectly safe wherever you put it, either across the 'planks' or along the length.
     
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  9. BlackCat3

    BlackCat3

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    Even at that weight? 700lbs / 325kg or thereabouts?

    I worked out the rough weight of the furniture in the bedroom and that's around 500lbs (without any of my rubbish) and I never gave that a second thought.

    I suppose it's just the risk of damage from 325ltrs of water if it were to go wrong that is causing my anxiety. Oh and did I mention I overthink everything...
     
  10. conny

    conny

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    A 45 gallon drum of machine oil contains approximately 208 litres and is heavier than the equivalent volume of water.
    This can easily stand on an open boarded, lightweight, wooden pallet with no danger of breaking so I am confident the equivalent of around 1 1/2 drums will easily cause no problem on a strengthened concrete beam.

    Stop over thinking is my advice.
     
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  11. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    A pallet is flat and supported under its entire surface by the ground or the forks of a truck.
     
  12. conny

    conny

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    A pallet is constructed from a base of 4 sides with a central strap board to stop it twisting. On top of this baseboard are, usually, 9 blocks of either wood or compressed chipboard which support a top framework identical to the base. It then has a number of infill boards across the top frame which may be close boarded, i.e. gaps of around 1/2" between them, or open boarded where the gaps can be as large as 4" or more.
    When we got a delivery the oil drum was always stood upright in the centre of a 3' x 3' open boarded pallet. The centre of the drum, (or near enough the centre), would be over the central support block but the rim would simply be resting on the bearer strips.
     
  13. fillyboy

    fillyboy

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    Don't ever buy a water bed.(n)
     
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