Corded drill - different to other posts

I

imamartian

I have a dewalt cordless which i use lots and love to bits... and i have a cheap but marvelous SDS drill... but my B&D corded drill has given up the ghost.... so i'm buying a new one (it's only role probably will to drill holes in masonary where i don't want to run down the battery on my cordless) - but of all the qualities of a new drill which should i focus on:

1. wattage? for example 750W to 1080W does this translate to brute power?

2. single speed/2-speed/variable speed? seeing as this drill will probably on be for drilling holes

3. 13mm/16mm chuck - what;s it matter?

4. keyed chuck - am i bothered?

Your opinions are very welcome
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
13 Jan 2006
Messages
977
Reaction score
1
Location
Bristol
Country
United Kingdom
I'm puzzled to know why you need a corded drill for masonry if you already have an SDS drill (unless the SDS is a cordless, you don't say).

The power of the drill you choose will be governed by the maximum diameter you expect to drill in a given material. Input power is not the same as output (which is always less); presumably the ratio of input to output power varies from one manufacturer to another. Generally speaking the greater the power, the heavier and more cumbersome the tool.

I'd choose a variable speed drill, as there will be occasions when you need to start slowly when drilling something delicate. You do need slow and fast speeds anyway for different diameters and materials.

Most jobs need no more than a 13mm chuck, which will take all kinds of bits (blacksmith drills, hole saws, cone cutters, spade bits etc.) which cut much larger diameters.

Most good quality drills come with keyless chucks nowadays. I don't know of any advantage in having a keyed chuck.

But of all you want to do is to drill holes in masonry, unless you're doing core drilling you need an SDS drill.
 
I

imamartian

thanks for the reply xerxes. Very helpful.

My SDS drill is one of those huge Ferm rotary hammer drills and is a bit cumbersome for most DIY jobs - i use it for breaking concrete usually. Plus it doesn't fit into my drill press thing.
 
Joined
21 Oct 2004
Messages
9,979
Reaction score
188
Location
Sussex
Country
United Kingdom
in that case get a light sds one. ive got a hitachi one, cost about £95 and its served me well. i have a corded hammer drill. it gathers dust in the garage. its ryobi. i rate it as pants to ****e
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
21 Oct 2004
Messages
19,558
Reaction score
25
Country
United Kingdom
...i'm buying a new one (it's only role probably will to drill holes in masonary...) - but of all the qualities of a new drill which should i focus on:

1. wattage? for example 750W to 1080W does this translate to brute power?

2. single speed/2-speed/variable speed? seeing as this drill will probably on be for drilling holes

3. 13mm/16mm chuck - what;s it matter?

4. keyed chuck - am i bothered?
Not one of those attributes is relevant.

Buy SDS+, and pay enough for one to last as long as you need it to last.
 
Joined
27 Apr 2008
Messages
8,781
Reaction score
730
Country
United Kingdom
IF you want cheap & cheerful then Argos is the place to go :D
Cant get much cheaper than the challenge extreme 1050w - it does the job, is light weight, and you can throw it away when the job is done, or keep it till the next one.


I have been using mine on my 1850 stone walled house and its not failed on anything yet.
SDS is fine but when my long drill bits are not SDS I'm hesitant to go buy all new ones just for SDS (SDS drills are usually very short).

(Well he did say cheap & cheerful) ;)
 
Joined
27 Apr 2008
Messages
8,781
Reaction score
730
Country
United Kingdom
The OP is not asking for an SDS drill.

All the SDS small diameter drill bits I have are short, you can only go in so far because the shank is a lot wider.

A real pain when trying to hang stuff that uses thin but long screws.

You can get longer SDS drills but why buy new ones if you already have perfectly adequate ones.
 
Joined
21 Oct 2004
Messages
19,558
Reaction score
25
Country
United Kingdom
The OP is not asking for an SDS drill.
The OP said:
Your opinions are very welcome
_____________

All the SDS small diameter drill bits I have are short, you can only go in so far because the shank is a lot wider.

A real pain when trying to hang stuff that uses thin but long screws.
If it hurts, then don't do it.

You can get longer SDS drills but why buy new ones if you already have perfectly adequate ones.
The OP already has an SDS+ drill and SDS+ bits.
 
Joined
21 Oct 2004
Messages
9,979
Reaction score
188
Location
Sussex
Country
United Kingdom
The OP is not asking for an SDS drill.

All the SDS small diameter drill bits I have are short, you can only go in so far because the shank is a lot wider.

A real pain when trying to hang stuff that uses thin but long screws.

You can get longer SDS drills but why buy new ones if you already have perfectly adequate ones.

get a normal chuck for it and then there is no problem. best of both worlds
 
Joined
27 Apr 2008
Messages
8,781
Reaction score
730
Country
United Kingdom
The OP has said that his SDS drill is big & heavy & would like an ordinary drill as well.
As the OP's old drill has died I think its safe to assume that the OP also has ordinary bits.

As much as you guys really like SDS drills, they have their place as well as ordinary chucked drills having their place too.
 
I

imamartian

The OP has said that his SDS drill is big & heavy & would like an ordinary drill as well.
As the OP's old drill has died I think its safe to assume that the OP also has ordinary bits.

As much as you guys really like SDS drills, they have their place as well as ordinary chucked drills having their place too.

correct.

it's required to fill the gap between my dewalt 14.4v cordless, and my Ferm rotary hammer drill thing - easier up a ladder, or using sanding discs, or fitting in my drill press, or just more convenient around the house.
 
Joined
21 Oct 2004
Messages
19,558
Reaction score
25
Country
United Kingdom
The OP has said that his SDS drill is big & heavy & would like an ordinary drill as well.
Don't be silly - he said no such thing. He said that it's likely to be exclusively for masonry.

As the OP's old drill has died I think its safe to assume that the OP also has ordinary bits.
It's never safe to assume anything.

As much as you guys really like SDS drills, they have their place as well as ordinary chucked drills having their place too.
You guys? The last time I checked there was only one of me. :confused:

Notwithstanding that, ordinary chucked drills have no place in masonry drilling.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top