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Cracks In Walls

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by novaf4, 3 Feb 2020.

  1. novaf4

    novaf4

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    My Victorian flat has developed cracks where walls meets walls. I think it's caused by vibrations from the flat upstairs' washing machine. Photos attached.

    I've cut out a section at one spot with a stanley knife. It's hard to tell how deep the crack goes. I can see old paint, old lining paper and plaster but I haven't dared open up so much that I can see any brick. I'd like to make this a quick, easy fix that will hopefully last at least 5 years. What I don't want is a complete wall smashing dust fest.

    My research shows that Toupret Fibacryl Flexible Crack is worth using. But should I only use that or in conjuction with something else?

    Any tips and advice would be much appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

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  3. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    novaf4, good evening.

    From the images posted, it would appear that the room has been split at some time historically, it would be unusual to have a cornice "disappear" as your image shows, normally a cornice is all the way around a "room"

    If you tap the two walls in the images does one sound "Solid" and the other sound "Hollow"???

    Ken.
     
  4. opps

    opps

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    It does look as though the wall where the cornice disappears is not original.

    I would be surprised if the washing machine upstairs is the root cause, but it is a possibility.

    I often recommend Fibracryl but be aware that it shrinks back quite a lot. Let it shrink and then use a filler of your choice over the top. Sand flat and then "prime". You can then caulk over that.

    If it were just a clean and persistent hairline crack I would have recommended a MS polymer such as CT1, they are as flexible as silicone but can be painted over.
     
  5. DIYnot Local

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