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Cutting thick hedges

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by cuboid, 20 Sep 2018.

  1. cuboid

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    Had really thick laurel. And it was getting on for 2 or 3 inches thick the lower u get. How do u bring this kind of hedge down? Pole pruner attachment on my multi tool? DSC_0224.JPG
     
  2. Ian H

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    I chainsawed my neighbours that hangs over our garden
    8CC8E7A1-B360-499B-8148-6A5CEB05D340.jpeg

    00E3F398-8E67-4CAA-BF67-10791CAD05FB.jpeg

    Hasn’t grown back as well as I thought.
     
  3. JohnD

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    I have a laurel. It's hardy.

    I cut it back to about six inches above the ground every few years, and it shoots out cheerfully.

    A lopper takes out some of the legs, and I use a pruning saw on the thick ones. They aren't woody.

    The leaves don't burn or compost well.
     
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  4. StephenOak

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    I have a line of laurels that were getting too big, the highest parts were 15+ foot up. So I have cut the worst of them down to c. knee height. The thickest parts were 4-6 inches. Mostly I cut by hand but I used my chainsaw on a few bits. BTW I took the tops out before cutting the main trunks down. Laurels are very hardy, the ones I cut down (early 2017) had put on at least 4 foot of growth when I took these photos in March this year

    IMG_20180320_173436167.jpg IMG_20180320_173507907.jpg IMG_20180320_173642373.jpg

    I have cut off some of the shoots that were very near the ground or were growing more horizontal. I plan on cutting off at the base any shoots that get above c. head height to make this more of a hedge rather than a set of trees.

    I have no problem composting the leaves, etc. I shred everything and just chuck it into the bin. Mind you I have a large garden and put a lot of stuff (several cubic yards) into the bins each year. Maybe @JohnD is talking composting where the majority is laurel leaves.
     
  5. cuboid

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    I am thinking of getting the petrol pruning saw attachment for my Stihl multi tool. That would be ideal for branches too thick for hedgcutter wouldn't it? What do u guys think about the safety aspect of using a chainsaw?
     
  6. StephenOak

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    Chainsaws are potentially very dangerous. I spent more on PPE than I did on the chainsaw. I have never used a pruning chainsaw so I don't have any direct experience, but I think that you still need ear defenders, face protection and protective boots as a minimum. I don't know how near your hands & legs will get to a running chain but I think I would also use chainsaw gloves and trousers.
     
  7. Ian H

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    I wore a t-shirt and shorts.

    I’m sure the Stihl tool would do it. Before I bought my electric chainsaw I used my neighbours mini chainsaw on a pole and that was good.
     
  8. StephenOak

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    One of my neighbours had on gloves and ear defenders and no other PPE. Last job of the day with his chainsaw (when it was getting dark so he was hurrying a bit and he was somewhat tired) was tidying up a couple of trunks he has cut down.

    I had seen him earlier that day and when I happened down that way the next morning I was surprised he had not finished, that is until I saw a large brownish patch on the ground.

    He had slipped and the chainsaw had run down his leg (his trousers were as much protection as tissue paper) making a long cut which bleed profusely. He spent quite a time in A&E getting it cleaned & stitched up, a couple of days not really able to walk and a few weeks before he was fully recovered.

    Chainsaws, and similar motors, are loud so you always need ear defenders, if you are cutting stuff above you bits will fall down, so you really need face/eye protection and protective boots.

    Other than ear defenders you will get away w/o the PPE 99 times out of a hundred and that hundredth time you will really wish you had it on.
     
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  9. cuboid

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    Pruning saw


    To cut thick hedge branches ?

    You don't need the PPE like a normal chainsaw do u?
     
  10. cuboid

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    That was a chainsaw, wasn't it? Not Pruning saw.

    What is the PPE for 1) Pruning saw?
    2) chainsaw?

    Sounds like protective trousers
     
  11. StephenOak

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    Indeed it was a chainsaw. The context was a question saying
    posted by you.

    I'm not fully clear what you are now asking.
     
  12. cuboid

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    I was wondering what PPE is needed for either chain saw and Pruning saw
     
  13. StephenOak

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    As chainsaw PPE has already been covered I'm not sure why you are asking about that.

    Pruning saw PPE is mostly common sense. If I'm using it in my hand I have on tough gardening gloves in case I slip. If I'm using it overhead I will have eye / face protection on if the blade is directly above and so stuff is falling down on me. If I'm using it overhead and I'm cutting off something substantial that could fall on me I will wear protective boots.
     
  14. cuboid

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    Hehe
     
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