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Damage to flat, repair feels potentially poor. Any advice?

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by boxrick, 12 Oct 2021.

  1. boxrick

    boxrick

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    Location:
    Cleveland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Good afternoon I had some damage in my flat from a broken rainwater hopper, it flooded my front room and has caused mould on the walls, this was after having the entire room gutted, reskimmed and flooring replaced around 6 months back for leaking problems caused by something else.

    The wall still feels damp

    The contractor is talking about putting 'blocker' on the walls and simply re-painting over it. Is this going to be sufficient. It feels like this is a considerably more major job than that. He is literally doing it as we speak... not sure if I need to make more of a fuss.

    Any opinions would be appreciated.

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  2. Swwils

    Swwils

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    It's possible they have left out the insulation during the repairs, or have not fixed the original leak.

    Do not attempt any cover up or bodge.
     
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  4. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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    Hi,
    Even if the leaks have been fixed on the exterior, it could take many weeks for the walls to fully dry out.

    In your photos, there is already evidence of salts being brought out of the masonry.
    This could continue for a while.

    Is the contractor repairing as part of an insurance claim?
    If so, they will only be interested in sorting the issue as quickly as possible.

    A blocker may 'work', but it will seal in the dampness and salts still may break out to the surface.

    Really, your walls need time to properly dry out before repairs are attempted.
     
    Last edited: 12 Oct 2021
  5. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    The "internal Structure" appears to be damp / wet causing surface staining.

    Were De-humidifiers and air blowers used? and I mean large 1.0.m3 bits of kit that are really noisy, say 3 or 4 air movers and at least two BIG De-Hums ?? and for how long??

    If it is an Insurance claim ??? contact your Insurer, NOT the "Contractor" send images to the Insurer and kick off at them.

    Using a "blocker" is akin to a sticking plaster over a heart attack.

    Ken.
     
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