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damp and mould on walls and ceiling

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by myanne, 13 Oct 2013.

  1. myanne

    myanne

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    Hello,
    After the heavy rain I was shocked to see spots across a corner of the lounge ceiling and damp down the adjacent wall. We have always had a couple of mysterious damp spots half way up the wall but now it's really bad. Because our house is old the guttering is a bit dodgy and overspills here and there even though we have had it "repaired". However I can't understand why upstairs in not affected - just the downstairs wall and ceiling in the corner.
    Also about 9 months ago I asked for advice about a paint I could use to cover cracks and I got great advice from Burnerman but life events took over and didn't get round to it. I wonder if the rain is seeping through the cracks in the render and through the old brickwork of the house.
    I would appreciate any advice on this as I am baffled as to the cause.
    Thank you
     
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  3. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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    The ceiling is condensation.

    The wall most probably penetrating unless its a cavity wall then you need to look at the gutters.

    Is that wall a chimney breast?
     
  4. myanne

    myanne

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    Hello Alastair,
    Thank you so much for replying. The wall is an outside wall and not a chimney breast. I'm amazed that the ceiling is condensation - will taht make it easier to repair? How do I go about it? The wall isn't cavity filled so is it just a question of filling in the cracks in the render?
    I really appreciate your help. :)
     
  5. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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    Hi Anne, the condensation spotting should clean off with a weak solution of bleach and hot water.

    The penetrating damp through the wall will be causing moisture levels to rise in the room and will condense in the nearest cold spot.

    Can you upload pictures of the outside adjacent to the damp patch, also the gutters above.
     
  6. myanne

    myanne

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    Hi Alastair,
    You're brilliant - thank you so much.
    I have attached some photos - I hope you can see the cracks and the gutters.
    I have also attached a picture of the plants at the bottom of the house as I wonder whether the soil and moisture there might play a part.
     
  7. myanne

    myanne

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    These are the pictures. Thanks.
     
  8. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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  9. myanne

    myanne

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    Hello Alastair,
    I can't thank you enough. I would never have thought of removing that bush but it makes sense now you mention it.
    We'll try and get those cracks filled - I am assuming something like exterior Polyfilla. Then we'll repaint the whole front of the house.
    I have been really really worried about all this but you have totally sorted it and given up lots of your free time. THANK YOU!!! :D
     
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  11. Alastairreid

    Alastairreid

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    You're very welcome Anne :D

    Just be aware, once you have remedied the cause of the dampness it will take the wall a while to dry out and the plaster may need replaced.
     
  12. joe-90

    joe-90

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    Hey Alastair. I reckon you've pulled mate. :LOL:
     
  13. myanne

    myanne

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    He's my sort of man! :eek:
     
  14. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Hi Myra, there sure is a high level of moisture in those rooms.....once you get the render sorted, you might like to consider using a dehumidifier to help dry things out - domestic ones are available at around £100 and they can shift 5 litres of water a day!
    You don't mention what sort of heating you have, and how concientious you are about ventilation?
    John :)
     
  15. myanne

    myanne

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    Hi Burnerman!!
    We do have a lot of moisture in the house. I have bought those little dehumidifiers but they don't seem to do much so a proper one might be a good idea.
    We have gas central heating but we have only just started putting it on.
    As for ventilation we never seem to have any windows open throughout Autumn and Winter as it would be too cold. The air bricks at the bottom of the house are always getting clogged up with leaves. You have reminded me of that.
    Do you think we should have a window open somewhere? :confused:
     
  16. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Well, the more ventilation the better really.....dehumidifiers work really well at warmer temperatures, greater than 15 deg. If the temperature falls low, down to 8 deg say, then they hardly work at all.
    Its not a good idea to dry clothes inside and any shower rooms or kitchens should have exterior ventilation.
    Do keep the air bricks clear (it sounds like you have suspended timber floors) but if the damp shows quickly after rain, then thats becoming urgent regarding the render repair!
    If there's any spillage from the downcomer pipes from the gutters, that needs to be dealt with too, and any soil level on the outside must be lower than the damp course (often the air bricks actually sit on the DPC on older properties).
    Regards
    John :)
     
  17. myanne

    myanne

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    This has given me lots to think about. Everything you say makes sense. I can't understand why we have this render on the house. Next door the house is identical but render was never put on and the brick looks good. It makes me wonder if there was a problem at some time and that's why it was put on. The house also had a well and the house next door and the one next to that so it seems there is or was water under the ground. I don't know if that's causing the problem also.
    Yes I do dry some clothes in the airing cupboard upstairs and there isn't a window in the bathroom or shower room! This house is driving me crazy but we've been here 26 years now and are very attached to it. I feel it might be the time to move soon though!
    I think the soil will have to go after what you said and the render also may have to be done again but I will try all the advice first.
    Amazing info from you,
    Thank you for your input - I really appreciate it. :)
     
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