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Disconnecting plumbing to bath whilst renovating

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by paulo12345, 14 Sep 2011.

  1. paulo12345

    paulo12345

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    I need to take out my old bath to allow me to decorate and re tile the bathroom before installing a free standing bath in the same place.

    Physically removing the bath looks fairly straightforward but it is disconnecting the plumbing and securing it while the bath is out (probably for a couple of weeks) that is the problem.

    I have not done any plumbing jobs before so would be grateful if someone could explain the best way to disconnect the bath in terms a novice like myself will understand and how to preserve the pipes to re-install the new bath while ensuring water can't get out while there is no bath there when i switch the water supply back on.

    Thanks for any help.
     
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  3. ChrisOxford

    ChrisOxford

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    1. Switch off both hot and cold water supplies, and double check that nothing comes out of taps when you turn them on.

    2. Cut pipes, using something like a PipeSlice, fairly near the taps. Be prepared for a bit of water to come out, have a roasting tray or similar and rags to hand.

    3. Use "stop ends" to seal the cut ends of the pipes so that you can switch the water back on. You can buy "push fit" ones which literally just push on, or "compression" ones which you fit with a couple of spanners. Your supply pipe sizes will either be 15mm or 22mm or possibly one of each.

    4. Unscrew the trap from the bath's waste, leaving it attached to the waste pipe. Stuff a ball of newspaper into the open end to stop it filling up with decorating debris.

    5. Cut the silicone around the edge of the bath and remove it.

    Good luck.
     
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  4. kirkgas

    kirkgas

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    the previous post is spot on, apart from suggesting you use push fit stop ends, IF your pipes are old they will be 3/4" the new stop ends will be 22mm and slightly bigger and could leak and cause a lot of damage, if you ae unsure of the age of the pipes you might be better getting 22mm compression stop ends and 3/4"x22mm olives which are thicker than the normal ones and take up the difference, get a roll of ptfe tape as well and wind some round whichever olive you use, make sure you give them a good tighten up and you will be fine, what is the bath made of? if pressed steel or plastic it will be fine to lift out, if it is cast iron it will be easier (although noisier) to smash it into quarters with a mash hammer, (goggles and ear defenders are a must for this as enamel will be flying everywhere)
     
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  5. ChrisOxford

    ChrisOxford

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    Good point, Kirkgas :)

    Paulo... You say you're new to plumbing. Are you planning to fit the new bath too? That's quite a bit harder!
     
  6. paulo12345

    paulo12345

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I will probably get someone in to do the tiling, replace the toilet, and fit the new bath and sink but want to do some of the less skilled work myself hence the need to get the bath out of my way.
     
  7. kirkgas

    kirkgas

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    haha yes we are not insulted that removal of the old suite is not classed as skilled work :eek:
     
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