Distorted Roof Beam

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We have just had a homebuyers survey report come back for the property we are selling and they have advised on a structural engineer for a distorted/deflected beam (pictures attached) - The buyer of the property is happy to proceed only if a structural engineer is brought out and the work is completed off the back of the results. Does anyone have any advice on this? Ideally, i'd rather get a quote from a builder on the beam than spend the money on a surveyor then additional work
 

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To be fair the purlin does look pretty twisted

I wonder if that needs doing under building regs as it’s structural….Ive no idea

I can see what you are saying regarding just getting it done and let’s be honest it’s prob been like it donkeys years so it would seem logical to get a chippie in to replace with a purlin at least as big as the existing….but without a S/E design there’s no evidence it would be correct (despite copying original)

I have to say, it’s a loft with a surprising lack of bits of timber struts etc.
 
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Is there a reason why you have to keep this particular buyer?
There isnt. Ideally i'd like a cash buyer. I'd just assume if we find another mortgage buyer the same reason will prop up once they do another survey?
 
There isnt. Ideally i'd like a cash buyer. I'd just assume if we find another mortgage buyer the same reason will prop up once they do another survey?
These days it’s becoming increasingly common for the home survey report to be an opportunity to get money knocked off.

So you may well be right.

I would say it doesn’t matter so much whether it’s a cash buyer or not, but rather whether there is a big chain or not.
 
We have just had a homebuyers survey report come back for the property we are selling and they have advised on a structural engineer for a distorted/deflected beam (pictures attached) -

Is the beam which is a concern, the horizontal one? If so it looks fine in the photos, what would raise concerns is the length of timber added at an angle, alongside the breeze wall, which seems to be a prop. I cannot see the prop, being much help, when the horizontal timber rests on that wall. Or am I missing something?
 
I can see what you are saying regarding just getting it done and let’s be honest it’s prob been like it donkeys years so it would seem logical to get a chippie in to replace with a purlin at least as big as the existing….but without a S/E design there’s no evidence it would be correct (despite copying original)
Then again if there hadn't been an issue with the purlin everything would have carried on as normal and no thought would have been given to the structural integrity of the roof. Looks to me as its a rake of old terrace houses that had one continuous loft in the past with the purlin supported on individual brick columns and the loft has been compartmentalised at a later date with breeze blocks for security/fire purposes, if that is the case none of the roof will have been designed to current TRADA tables as we know them. A replacement with a like for like purlin should be an acceptable solution to the buyer and if not tell him to get an SE in to checkout the roof if he feels so inclined.
 
We have just had a homebuyers survey report come back for the property we are selling and they have advised on a structural engineer for a distorted/deflected beam (pictures attached) - The buyer of the property is happy to proceed only if a structural engineer is brought out and the work is completed off the back of the results. Does anyone have any advice on this? Ideally, i'd rather get a quote from a builder on the beam than spend the money on a surveyor then additional work
Let the buyer beware, the onus is on them to identify any works, and then negotiate a drop in the price if justified. Otherwise anything you do, they can pick holes in, and ultimately dop out at any time before exchange. Plus they have no contractual relationship with whoever does the works should there be issues after they buy it. It is worth getting your own independent professional opinion before you take any further steps, it may just indicate there isn't an issue of any significance.
 
Do as requested, or get all "gung ho" and try to find another buyer in January in a falling housing market. (Two years ago I'd be telling them to "do one" and have it back on the market for 5k more)

Unfortunately a builder could put in a beam the size of the Forth Bridge but (certainly for the current buyer) it will need SE input. They would be unwise and unlikely to ignore the professional advice they have paid for to accept "my mate's a builder, he's put another one in"

I think (assuming you find a reasonably priced engineer, and he doesn't find a simple solution such as additional propping off a spine wall etc), your bigger issue will be finding a builder who will hoike a £100 lump of timber up there without charging you thousands - someone who has a tower scaffold or can see a route through a window and hole in the ceiling.

If the sale falls through and you get your builder to do a like for like (or a bit bigger - there must be a reason the original failed!), the new problem you'll face is trying to make it look like it's been there for 20 years and not two weeks - because that will set the alarm bells ringing for the new surveyor -

As an aside, how can people have so little insulation in their loft theses days!
 
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