DIYer Jigsaw - incapable of a straight line!

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Cambridgeshire
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United Kingdom
I've tried an Argos old cheappo electric, and two different Einhell battery powered jigsaws and I just cannot cut a straight line!

I've been using it to cut oak floor pieces, the electric one is the 'straightest' but still very wonky, the battery powered ones veer off to one side. What am I doing wrong - other than clearly doing it wrong!

I've tried a slight amount of pressure to cut, but it always goes wonky.
 
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just a diyer - how thick is this OAK
what blades are you using
are you using a guide - like a roofing square

does the blade sit in a guide - roller

I would suggest maybe not using a jig saw

i used a sliding mitre saw when laying flooring recently and the jig saw with a special laminate blade to cut odd shapes out
 
For nice, clean, straight cuts, forget about the jigsaw; beg, borrow, or hire a sliding mitre saw, or even a mini circular saw.
They will do a far better job on material such as engineered wood flooring.
 
general comments
even expensive trade jigsaws can cut off line
never use a strait edge with a jigsaw to cut along
look at the blade and follow the line ignore what the body is doing as many saws crab
if you start to go off line gradually get back on line if you try too quickly it can get far worse
as said above sharp correct blade makes all the difference and change the blade every say 10m as it important expensive work but keep the blades for less important timber where sharpness cleanness and accuracy wont hurt so much
but as said by others dead strait equals a saw and fence
 
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If you screw a bit of ply or acrylic to the base plate, with a narrow slot as wide as the blade, this can stop the blade wobbling excessively and keep it straight. The thinner and softer the material being cut the better.
 
My Festool jigsaw has a plate that runs along their guide rails. I have only used it once. I had to cut 18mm ply flooring and my plunge saw was elsewhere.

I was extremely impressed with the finish. I didn't however use an engineering square to test it. I did have the splinter guard fitted at the time.

A decent jigsaw with a decent blade should not deviate much. I once used mine to replicate a porch support. The timber was 75mm thick. I used the 105mm thicker Festool Carvex blades (which required me to adjust the blade guide "shoes") . The deviation on the underside was less than 0.5mm.

I am pretty sure that @JobAndKnock 's Mafell is even more accurate.

 
I was amazed by how straight was the cut on my makita 18 volt cordless jig saw compared to my old b & d tool. Mafell do the ultimate jigsaw with a unique system to ensure the blade remains straight

Blup
 
I was amazed by how straight was the cut on my makita 18 volt cordless jig saw compared to my old b & d tool. Mafell do the ultimate jigsaw with a unique system to ensure the blade remains straight

Blup
The Mafell is stunning, you can even put the blade in backwards for under cuts. Chuffin expensive though.
 
I found that my Bosch jigsaw was much better than the B&D I had before. The Bosch is now obsolete, looks like the closest current one is the GST 90 BE, but if I was replacing I'd go for a bigger one, maybe look on eBay for a good used one.

Anyway - bendy cut problems basically went away, BUT

Use the right blades.

Use good quality blades.

Use sharp blades when you need best quality cuts.

AND GO SLOWLY.
 
The Mafell is stunning, you can even put the blade in backwards for under cuts. Chuffin expensive though.
There are a couple of good looking used ones on eBay right now. But still expensive, even if bargains.
 
There are a couple of good looking used ones on eBay right now. But still expensive, even if bargains.

Yeah. I cannot justify the price given that my Festool jigsaw is still fine after 12(?) years.
 
My Bosch is about 23 years (easy to know, as it was temporarily rebranded by Bosch as the GST-2000 to celebrate the new millennium), but then it only gets light DIY use.
 
My Bosch is about 23 years (easy to know, as it was temporarily rebranded by Bosch as the GST-2000 to celebrate the new millennium), but then it only gets light DIY use.

Ahhh.. you have the Bosch GST 85?

If so, a builder I worked for, over 20 years ago, he had a GST 85. I think he had had it for quite a few years.
 

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