Do all walls have studs?

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I have had some shelves come down from a plasterboard wall. I had used some things designed for plasterboard but I guess they/the wall wasn't strong enough.

I can repair that ok but if I. To put the shelves back up I will need to find the studs to screw into.

I have been using a really strong magnet and I cannot find more than the odd screw. Looking at the plasterboard it has foam attached to the reverse. As this is an exterior brick wall could they have stuck the boards directly to the brick walls without using any studs?

If so, what are my options?
 
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My other problem then is it appears that the plasterboard/insulation has pulled away a bit from the wall.

Do I need to cut the lot away remove the insulation from the brickwork and patch another piece in, or is there a way to re attach the current plasterboard?
 
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One thing to remember when fixing to dot and dab is that if you fix through a hollow part it can pull the plasterboard in a bit. There are special fixings to get round this.
 
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Use a spacer to transfer the load directly to the wall solid wall.
 

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One thing to remember when fixing to dot and dab is that if you fix through a hollow part it can pull the plasterboard in a bit. There are special fixings to get round this.

Not sure I understand what you mean.

"Fix through a hollow part"?
 
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When the boards are fixed with dabs of adhesive there are parts of the board with a void between them and the wall. Fixings like Corefix are specially designed for dot and dab.
 
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Is there any way to reattach a section to the wall without taking the whole section down?

I don't know why but the builder used 24" wide sections with what looks like 50mm deep blue insulation on the back.

The top section has been pulled away from the wall and is no longer firmly attached.

I would prefer to reattach to the wall if possible but not sure if this is possible.

Once fixed, what fittings would work through 50-60mm of insulation and plasterboard in holding a heavy shelf? (The wall behind is very hard brick work)
 
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You can get Corefix in 100mm and 120mm lengths. Not as cheap as screws and plugs, but ideal for dot and dab with heavy loads.
 

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Depends how thick the insulation is, but I have 50mm insultation with 10mm plasterboard, so use 120mm screws with 7mm masonry drill bit and brown plugs. That has worked OK so far, touch wood! I have brick behind - if it is a soft aerated block then you might need to go deeper, but I suspect it would be solid brick on the outside if retro fitting insulation boards?

IMO all plasterboard plugs are useless, unless you want to hang a picture (and don't have kids or stupid cleaners that are likely to pull on things).
 
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Rather primitive method when you can just use corafix.

Primitive, even crude but it does work, The wooden spacer spreads the load against the wall and thus reduces ( eliminates ) the risk of the screw bending at the point it enters the wall,

Corafix appears to rely on the steel core and the screw not bending under the vertical force created by the weight of the item it is supporting.
 
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Primitive, even crude but it does work, The wooden spacer spreads the load against the wall and thus reduces ( eliminates ) the risk of the screw bending at the point it enters the wall,

Corafix appears to rely on the steel core and the screw not bending under the vertical force created by the weight of the item it is supporting.
That’s right steel doesn’t bend .
 
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Long screws and plugs - i.e. drill through the soft material into the hard material and knock the rawl plug all the way (fully) into the masonry.

if you hammer a plug through a cavity and in to the solid masonry, when you tighten the screw, it will probably pull the plug forward, ie out of the hole in the masonry.

I have only used corefix once, £20 for a box but was happy with them. I used them for shelving racks, plasterboard with a cavity and thermolite blocks. I got decent fixings on about 90-95% of the fixings.
 

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