Does a pond provide relief for groundwater?

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We're on heavy clay, and are right next to the sea so there's pressure from the sea on ground water levels.

The garden is often waterlogged, so I'm trying to think of ways to provide some relief. Thought a pond would create more space for water, as it takes out sand/clay and makes more room for water to flow there, and away from the surrounding area. Is this an idea that is worth exploring? Or will the effect be minimal?

There's also a borehole within approx. 4 -5m of where I want to locate the pond, which is collecting data to see if future development can take place in this area.
Would the pond affect the borehole data (by moving water away from the borehole), which I definitely don't want to happen.
 
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Best people to ask would be the bore hole analysts to see if they think it may materially affect their readings.
 
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my thoughts but no expert

ponds are lined so wont drain
if you build a pond without a liner it then becomes a sump that will eventually drain but on the same token it may stay filled to some extent or vary in level possibly even bring salt water into you garden iff the sump is below the water table level at the bottom
 
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We're on heavy clay, and are right next to the sea so there's pressure from the sea on ground water levels.

The garden is often waterlogged, so I'm trying to think of ways to provide some relief. Thought a pond would create more space for water, as it takes out sand/clay and makes more room for water to flow there, and away from the surrounding area. Is this an idea that is worth exploring? Or will the effect be minimal?

There's also a borehole within approx. 4 -5m of where I want to locate the pond, which is collecting data to see if future development can take place in this area.
Would the pond affect the borehole data (by moving water away from the borehole), which I definitely don't want to happen.
I think you would need to be extremely careful when filling the pond not to leave the hose running, this could corrupt the data from the borehole, make the ground appear too wet and they may not build much needed homes for all the poor refugees desperately needing somewhere to live.
 
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I'm not planning on filling the pond or lining it. I just want to dig a hole for the groundwater to go, instead of all over the rest of the garden. If that would make a difference. Otherwise I'll not go through the effort.
 
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A sump will allow water to collect and if the collected water can then be piped to a lower point, the sump will drain and with it the general ground water too.

The sump could be totally covered, no need for it to be an open to the surface pond. The risk is, that if the water level at the pipe discharge rises, so will the sump level too, unless there is a back flow valve to prevent it.
 
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You could consider planting water-loving plants and turn the area into a moss garden: large rocks may provide a breakwater to prevent too much water flooding your garden and moss will soak it up at an incredible rate. Smaller stones can be arranged to provide rock pools which will attract insects that will in turn bring birds into the garden to feed on them.
If you want to put a pond in by all means go ahead but as others have pointed out, it won't help drain flooding and will become clogged with all kinds of crunge when it happens to flood.
 
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I'm wondering if an area of coppiced willow would suck up enough to make a difference?
 
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I'm wondering if an area of coppiced willow would suck up enough to make a difference?

They certainly would. We had two massive willows, which used to help dry the (mostly heavy clay) back garden out. They got so big, took up so much room, I had to cut them down, garden is noticeably wetter since then.
 
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