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Does rear wall need to be directly above supporting steel beam?

Discussion in 'Building' started by r_c, 7 Aug 2016.

  1. r_c

    r_c

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    We have a ground floor extension, and have a beam to support the first floor. It seems odd to me that the beam is not inline with the rear wall of the first floor.

    I hope the photo and arrows show what has happened, where the beam is not directly below the upstairs wall.

    Is this kosher?

     
  2. vinn

    vinn

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    The RSJ "beam" is shown directly below on the section drawing but the "upstairs wall" appears to be stud framing in 2" x 6" so a little cantilevering out is fine and safe.
    Your Velux roof light is oddly trimmed but given its a short lean-to span it will be no big deal to correct.
    Final builds are often slightly different from the drawings - its the nature of the building game.
     
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  3. r_c

    r_c

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    Could you please elaborate "oddly trimmed". I do not understand what you mean by this.
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    It looks OK, veluxs and all
     
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  5. dom_k

    dom_k

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    It should be ok. The architect should have drawn an upstand beam supporting joists on a bolted runner. Would have been much neater losing the downstand.
     
  6. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Pardon?
     
  7. dom_k

    dom_k

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    The bottom of the beam should have been flush with the bottom of the joists. Bolt a timber into beam and support joists on hangers.
     
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  8. r_c

    r_c

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    Thank you all for your comments. This is actually what the structural engineer drew as part of his report. The drawing actually shows the T (if you look carefully you can see the second beam perpendicular to this main beam) of the main beam (pictured) and a second beam (which you can just see).

    The structural engineer has the upstairs wall on the main beam. No sign of joists or a mis-alignment of wall and beam in his drawing.

     
  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The beam is in a better place flush with that blockwork corner, avoiding an ugly set back when it's all boxed in.
    There is nothing wrong with a slight cantilever as long as the joists are big enough, which those are for that small projection.

    Presumably, the wall above has been put in that position for a reason? In which case is it that the engineer's drawing is incorrect?
     
  10. dom_k

    dom_k

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    It would have been better appearance wise built as drawn by the SE. I guess the builder may have been confused as the architect shows beam at a different level.
     
  11. r_c

    r_c

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    This isn't the first time that the builder is confused by the architects drawings. To be fair to the builder, the architects drawings leave a lot to be desired.

    It looks like the wall plate upstairs is not fully supported by the joists. Is that right? If the weight of the roof is in the walls, I would expect the walls to be fully supported by something. It looks like air to me.

     
    Last edited: 11 Aug 2016
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