Dripping tap after replacement (from under nut)

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Twofingertyper, 14 Nov 2021.

  1. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Hi all,

    Finally got around to changing a tap after it finally gave up and stopped turning off entirely (up until then it had been a bit stiff but nothing more).

    Quite limited space under the sink (looks like they put the taps on and then screwed to the wall given the limited space, but I am no expert…)

    It works - turns on/off and was a like for like replacement of the tap, but… there’s a drip from under the bolt (that cannot be tightened further) - it’s not huge, but sufficient enough to need fixing.

    Any ideas on why this could be?
     

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  3. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Just tidying up in defeat - a rather suspicious looking dried out washer… potentially…

    should the bolt have one? I can’t see to check, but wonder where else it could have come from (it could also just be a suspicious dirt ring)
     
  4. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Can only see one steel bolt at right angles to the tap shank and that wouldn't have anything to do with water by the looks of it, looks more like the bolt from a plug chain
     
  5. Madrab

    Madrab

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    P.S. hope that basin never needs to come off by the amount of silicone that seems to have been used.
     
  6. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    There should be a fibre washer under that union, connecting pipe to tap, where the two faces meet.
     
  7. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Sorry - typed in haste, for some reason I have always confused nut and bolt; so yes, I meant a drip from the nut - not the bolt, and yes, sadly, I think it's what was put in when the house was built and they wanted to make sure it'd never come off... or not until they were a good distance away...

    I think that's where this could be going wrong, but it's so hard to get any visibility due to the set-up, fumbling around blindly isn't the best solution, but the fact that there's a drip (and the mysterious half a washer shaped rubbish) suggests that it might be worth a try.
     
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  9. terryplumb

    terryplumb

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    You should always fit a new fibre washer when fitting a new tap ,and all traces of the old one should be removed from the tap connector first ,to ensure a leak free joint.
     
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  10. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    You learn something new everyday!

    Had I seen the washer I probably would have done this anyway, but given the tight workspace and awkward angle (also no isolator on the pipe, so the whole house water has to be shut off) it was a struggle.

    Will take apart and start again tomorrow.

    Thanks
     
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  11. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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    You could also fit an isolator while you're at it! ;)
     
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  12. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Your logic is great - but can I just have one thing going wrong at once? I’d probably buy the wrong isolator and then end up having to have the water turned off indefinitely do stop the water spurting out…

    (well, until I can get a pro to fix it)
     
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  13. Madrab

    Madrab

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    The nut should drop right down so you can see the flange that the fibre washer sits on, that'll ensure you can see that it is nice and clean before using a new one.
    Doesn't need to be super tight, as long as the nut tightens up easily with your fingers, then it's finger tight plus 1/4>1/2 turn.
     
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  14. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    All done - washer fixed it, thanks for the responses.

    As for the isolator - perhaps a job for another day...
     
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