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Electric to outbuildings

Discussion in 'Electrics Outside of the UK' started by Alan lewis, 5 Oct 2019.

  1. Alan lewis

    Alan lewis

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    I need to supply electricity to our cattery refuse. We have five cabins each of which I will install electric oil filled radiators which I understand are the safest to use. They demand 500 watts to 1500 watts supply each. The run of cable to a central point of supply is 50 metres. Would it be safe to take the supply from one 13 amp socket on a 2.5mm cable run and then split it to the five cabins. We are a charity and our funds are very limited. Please advise me


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    moderators note

    appears to be in France
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    Last edited by a moderator: 5 Oct 2019
  2. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Can you be a bit more specific on exactly how much they use?
    I.e. Have you 5 heaters that can take 1500w?
    That's 7500w in total, way more than 13amp (13a=3000w).

    An electrician will be along shortly to advise, and I hope that he notices that your not in the UK?
     
  3. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    If it is in France, the socket outlet connection used is probably a CEE 7/5 or a (Schuko) CEE 7/3, both of which are rated at 16 A.

    At 230 V, a 16 A socket outlet could supply up to 3680 W.

    However, what are the 5 separate cabins. Presumably these are 5 separate feline "living spaces" within a building.
    Hopefully, the 50 metre, 2.5 mm cable will be within a building and not run outside any structure.

    Such a cable will have a resistance of about 0.4 Ohms and, at 16 A, the voltage drop will be 6.4 Volts.
     
    Last edited: 6 Oct 2019
  4. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Shouldn't the resistance be double that (0.732Ω)?

    Actually 0.9Ω (0.878) for VD calculation.
     
  5. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    Yes. I was wrong in my calculation.

    I made a mistake in deriving the resistance per metre of 2.5 mm copper.
    My source was the table in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_wire_gauge where I interpolated the 2.5 mm CSA between the AWG sizes (#14 and #13) - but I got it wrong the first time.
    Recalculating, I believe that a 2.5 mm CSA copper conductor has a resistance of (approximately) 0.0069 ohms/metre
    (Since
    #13 is 2.62 mm, with a resistance of 0.006571 ohms/metre and
    #14 is 2.08 mm, with a resistance of 0.008286 ohms/metre)

    Hence two 50 metre conductors would have a resistance of 2 x 50 x 0.0069 ohms = 0.69 ohms, giving a voltage drop of 11.04 Volts.
     
  6. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    It is 0.00732Ω/m at the usual 30°C given in the regulations.
     
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