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electric under floor heating under ply floor with tiles on top

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Loz7, 30 Nov 2017.

  1. Loz7

    Loz7

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    Unfortunately I have just tiled a bathroom floor and didnt think about underfloor heating until now:eek:

    The ceiling below hasn't been plasterboarded yet so I was wondering if I could put those electric heating mats or heating wire under the floor which is 18mm wbp ply?
     
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  3. DetlefSchmitz

    DetlefSchmitz

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    Well that's saved you from a bad mistake. UFH in a bathroom is a waste of money. The usable floor area is insufficient. Even wet UFH is wasted in a bathroom. The best way to heat a bathroom is a wet heated towel rail or radiator.

    (BTW - I am a fan of wet UFH, but in the right place, and installed correctly.)
     
  4. mwatsonxx

    mwatsonxx

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    The joists will be in the way.
     
  5. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    When you did think of it, what did you think it would do that made you wish you had thought of it earlier?
     
  6. flameport

    flameport

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    No.

    They are designed to be set into the tile adhesive directly under the tiles, which will be impossible to do from below.
     
  7. Loz7

    Loz7

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    I just noticed the tiles were a quite cold to walk on which made me think of UFH,as I understand it,it is supposed to go in the tile adhesive..but there are companies in the US that put it under ply or a chipboard subfloor.
     
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  9. Loz7

    Loz7

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    I have got a towel rail to plumb in but I noticed the tiles are quite cold to walk on. but it seems too late anyway..
     
  10. Loz7

    Loz7

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    ok thanks for the straight forward answer.
     
  11. Loz7

    Loz7

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    in-between the joists..
     
  12. Iggifer

    Iggifer

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    Its ineffective through tiles and adhesive alone. Under 18mm WBP and adhesive & tiles you'd barely feel it.

    If you REALLY want it, then consider taking the floor up. But I know plenty of people who've installed it and simply never turn it on because it's time to temp is so slow you have to run it for ages just to take the chill off, and it costs you a fortune to run.

    My last bathroom had no UFH, the cheapest answer is just a nice big fluffy bath mat! Probably cost you the same as a weeks UFH running costs.
     
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  13. Loz7

    Loz7

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    Yeah I think your right- the simpler the better,bath mat it is.
     
  14. SimonH2

    SimonH2

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    Not just the US, done over here as well. But that's generally for wet systems, and you need large (aluminium) spreader plates or a slab of weak cement (which also adds thermal mass) to spread the heat over a usable area.
    I can confirm the noise issue mentioned on the page I've linked to above - I was at my brother's house the other day when the upstairs heating turned on, there was a lot of creaking as the plastic pipe and then spreader plates heated up. He has engineered boards and mostly no carpets.
     
  15. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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