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Erecting new Fence using Feather board and Rails etc

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by diywhynot, 14 Aug 2017.

  1. diywhynot

    diywhynot

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    My current wooden fence being some 15 years old with 3 x 3 posts 4ft high in the ground with individual panels.

    It is now needing replacement before the winter. My plan is to use 'post spikes' in the ground helping the posts from rot, using '75 x 47' x 3 rows of horizontal rails and attaching 'feathered edge' boards vertically at 1.8mts high on top of wooden gravel boards.

    My question: As the current 1.2mt high posts survived some 10/15 years in the ground and now wanting to use spikes. But increasing the height to 1.8mts and that the posts will at 1.8 cts. Would 3 x 3 posts be sufficient @ 1.8 high or should I go for 4 x 4 posts.
     
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  3. r896neo

    r896neo

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    Post spikes are certainly not be up to the job of holding up 6ft of fencing. You need to use 4x4" posts and concrete them in to at least 18" depth.
     
  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    if you're going to the trouble of digging a hole and concreting them in, use concrete posts
     
  5. diywhynot

    diywhynot

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    Even at 1.8mts apart ?


    We don't want to see concrete posts as I've seen they are slotted, we prefer to see all wood. ?

    thanks
     
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    they look fine



    dark brown masonry paint is easier to match with dark brown fence stain, but I suppose you could do it in bright blue if you wanted. Concrete posts and gravel boards last many times longer than wood.
     
  7. wgt52

    wgt52

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    Use Concrete 'Soliders' - stub posts which the timber post is bolted to.
     
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  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    what I call "spurs?"

    I use them as well, but they are not as heavy so I think maybe not as stable for a big fence.

    Mine are also painted to match.

    I bet you can't see them.


    good for a low post-and-rail too

     
  10. wgt52

    wgt52

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    Yes - that's the item - different areas call them by different names...

    If you are putting up 4x4 wood posts use 4x4 spurs - typically 3'6" to 4' long - you want about half that in the ground.
     
  11. diywhynot

    diywhynot

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    Thanks peeps,

    I've opted for 4x4 posts coated with bitumen set in concrete.
     
  12. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    +1 on the 4x4 posts. Make sure they're treated.
     
  13. diywhynot

    diywhynot

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    Yes all materials used are treated, the area of the posts set in concrete will have a coating of bitumen to help protect.
     
  14. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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