Extending a Ring Circuit

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I have a ring circuit using 2.5mm T&E and protected by a 32Amp MCB.
I want to add 3 more sockets to the existing ring but maintain all of the existing sockets. The floor is concrete.

Can I make a join in the nearest socket and extend the ring from here. The last new socket will then return to this socket to complete the ring. My reservations are on the type of join. I don't have a solder iron and I think Wagos require a Wago Box which I do not have space for.

I think I also have the option to spur to a FCU and then add the new sockets as a radial to this but would prefer the ring option if possible.

Thanks in advance.
 
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depending on the depth of the existing back box you intend to statrt from you might be able to fit wagos in there to complete the ring but it will probably still be tight
 
depending on the depth of the existing back box you intend to statrt from you might be able to fit wagos in there to complete the ring but it will probably still be tight
I think I can fit the slim wago connectors in the back of the socket but not a wago box - if that is required?
 
Can I make a join in the nearest socket and extend the ring from here. The last new socket will then return to this socket to complete the ring.
Yes. In fact I someaht struggle to think of any other (conceptual) way in which one could 'extend a ring'.
My reservations are on the type of join. I don't have a solder iron and I think Wagos require a Wago Box which I do not have space for.
A Wago Box is only required if the joint has to be 'maintenance free' (i.e. if it is 'inaccessible') but a joint within the back box of a socket is no more inaccessible that the connections to the socket itself - and they are not regarded as inaccessible (hence are allowed to be 'screwed' terminals).

Therefore, provide the back box is big enough to accommodate the Wagos, that would be a perfectly acceptable approach. In fact, before the days of Wagos (and probably still now, for some) people would use bits of 'connector block' for this purpose.

Kind Regards, John
 
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Yes. In fact I someaht struggle to think of any other (conceptual) way in which one could 'extend a ring'.
The other obvious possibilites are.

1. Pull the old cable out of a socket and pull a new one in.
2. Cut/Join the cable in a floor/celing void.

Both become much less practical if you have solid floors through.
 
The other obvious possibilites are. ... 1. Pull the old cable out of a socket and pull a new one in. ... 2. Cut/Join the cable in a floor/celing void.
True, as a generalisation, but I was talking in the context of the OP ....
Both become much less practical if you have solid floors through.
Quite - and there's not really an "if" involved, given ...
.... The floor is concrete.

Eric's suggestion is (even with a solid floor) another option that I hadn't thought of, which is essentially using two socket modules also as "JBs".

Kind Regards, John
 
I coming from a double socket, a Screwfix LAP grid system with a 4 module plate and two sockets break the ring final nicely to add more sockets
Yes, several brands offer 13A sockets in "Euro module" form which allows two sockets on a faceplate with independent terminals.You have the screwfix LAP modules that you mention, Scholmore do them as part of their "New media" stuff, MK do tham as part of their "modular datacoms"stuff.

I see a few downsides to that approach though.

1. There are no switches, while switches aren't a strict requirement of BS7671 they are something that most people expect in a modern UK installation.
2. Euro module plates do not have an earth strap. So backbox earthing has to be handled manually.
3. I'm a little skeptical about having a mains socket held in place only by plastic clips.
 
Yes. In fact I someaht struggle to think of any other (conceptual) way in which one could 'extend a ring'.

A Wago Box is only required if the joint has to be 'maintenance free' (i.e. if it is 'inaccessible') but a joint within the back box of a socket is no more inaccessible that the connections to the socket itself - and they are not regarded as inaccessible (hence are allowed to be 'screwed' terminals).

Therefore, provide the back box is big enough to accommodate the Wagos, that would be a perfectly acceptable approach. In fact, before the days of Wagos (and probably still now, for some) people would use bits of 'connector block' for this purpose.

Kind Regards, John
I thought there was an additional requirement for the wagos to have cable restraint and that’s what was provided by the wago box. Have I misunderstood this part of it?
 
Yes, several brands offer 13A sockets in "Euro module" form which allows two sockets on a faceplate with independent terminals.You have the screwfix LAP modules that you mention, Scholmore do them as part of their "New media" stuff, MK do tham as part of their "modular datacoms"stuff.

I see a few downsides to that approach though.

1. There are no switches, while switches aren't a strict requirement of BS7671 they are something that most people expect in a modern UK installation.
2. Euro module plates do not have an earth strap. So backbox earthing has to be handled manually.
3. I'm a little skeptical about having a mains socket held in place only by plastic clips.
I’ve not come across these type of sockets. Can you provide a link please. Thanks
 
Yes, several brands offer 13A sockets in "Euro module" form which allows two sockets on a faceplate with independent terminals.You have the screwfix LAP modules that you mention, Scholmore do them as part of their "New media" stuff, MK do tham as part of their "modular datacoms"stuff. I see a few downsides to that approach though.
1. There are no switches, while switches aren't a strict requirement of BS7671 they are something that most people expect in a modern UK installation.
2. Euro module plates do not have an earth strap. So backbox earthing has to be handled manually.
3. I'm a little skeptical about having a mains socket held in place only by plastic clips.
Fair enough. A good few people might not regard (1) as a problem (and we don't even know whether the present double socket is switched), and (2) is easily addressed. I share your concerns about (3), but the fact that the products are 'allowed' presumably means that the security of the socket module is regarded as satisfactory.

However, if one remains concerned about one or more of those 'downsides', an alternative, but similar, approach (but one which would require more work and more disruption) would be to replace the double socket with two single switched sockets in a 'dual' backbox.

Kind Regards, John
 
I thought there was an additional requirement for the wagos to have cable restraint and that’s what was provided by the wago box. Have I misunderstood this part of it?
I suppose that, in theory, any sort of joint should have some sort of cable restraint but, except when it is required to be 'MF' (i.e. if not accessible) I don't think that many people would consider it essential in situations such as you mention - and there must be millions of examples out there.

If the cables entering the backbox are 'plastered in', then I imagine that would probably qualify as 'restraint', but that is not necessarily the case (e.g. with stud walls), and I've never heard of anyone complaining that the connection of cables to the socket terminals do not have explicit 'strain relief'!

If you put Wagos, or even bits oof connector block, in a socket's backbox, you will be in an awful lot of 'good company' :)

Kind Regards, John
 
I’ve not come across these type of sockets. Can you provide a link please. Thanks


 

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