Feather edge board fitting method

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There seems to be a wealth of opinions on how best to install a feather edge or close-board fence. Some say screw, some say nail, some say go through both feather-boards, some say go through just the one:
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Can someone offer up some reasoning behind each of the options and variations? I'm in the process of erecting about 40m of 6' fence, and would like to know the potential pitfalls. I'm considering screwing the panels as I don't have access to a nail-gun, however if there's a good reason not to, then I won't. Security and durability are the main concerns.
 
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I'm considering screwing the panels as I don't have access to a nail-gun
That doesn't make any sense to me its more labour intensive to screw them than use a nail + hammer. Screws will be more likely to split the boards.
 
I'm considering screwing the panels as I don't have access to a nail-gun
That doesn't make any sense to me its more labour intensive to screw them than use a nail + hammer. Screws will be more likely to split the boards.

I do have a drill-driver, screwing by hand would have me with Popeye arms by the end of the project :)

I have a pilot & countersink tool for the driver I would consider using if the boards did split, it's a quick swap bit with a driver bit on the reverse so fairly painless to do.
 
Having just done 120' of closeboarding I can say without any doubt nailing is the only way to go. Have never seen anyone screw featheredge and can't imagine why you would want to. 40mm galvanised nails, one per board top and bottom is all you need.

Don't make a meal of it :)
 
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Id use 50mm nails. Ring-shanks preferable, and nail through both boards, if you dont they will split.
 
I do have a drill-driver, screwing by hand would have me with Popeye arms by the end of the project :)

I have a pilot & countersink tool for the driver I would consider using if the boards did split, it's a quick swap bit with a driver bit on the reverse so fairly painless to do.
Fairly painless it may be but by the time you've fixed one board with screws you could have done a couple of boards with a hammer! :rolleyes:

Ignore anything on google that suggests screws. They're all wrong.
 
nail through one board only or you"ll have all the fun of taking off many boards just to replace one.
 
To be honest I've used both screws and nails. Normally though it's nails and I was always taught to nail through one board only , the nail going through one board and clamping the thin edge of the other board.
With regards to screwing I've done it when repairing old fencing that is showing it's age where the vibration of hammering may be an issue and once when someone had asked for it when they didn't want too much noise being made.
 
being a slight perfectionist, screws versus nails, nail heads can be hit into the timber to be disguised so from a distnace they cant be seen, screws stick out, even counter sunk, so you can see if the have been put in straight or like my neighbour, all over the shop and make a good job look wholy untidy.
 
As a follow-on question, assuming I'm nailing, and not using a nailgun, which nails and where to get them?

I'm thinking hot dipped ring shank at 40-50mm in length. However the usual outlets (screwfix, etc) don't seem to do this combination. Any suggestions?
 
Personally I wouldn't go more than 40mm. If you run off centre of the arris rail you can end up with nail points showing through. 40mm is more than adequate.
 
being a slight perfectionist, screws versus nails, nail heads can be hit into the timber to be disguised so from a distnace they cant be seen, screws stick out, even counter sunk, so you can see if the have been put in straight or like my neighbour, all over the shop and make a good job look wholy untidy.

I have to agree nails do look a lot better than screws in many cases , fences and floorboards for instance. On the subject of nailing I was taught that while it does look tidy to put them all in a nice straight line it's better practice to have them out of line. The reason being that a straight line of nails can exert a splitting effect on the timber they are being driven into. Ok so this piece of advice was given with cut nails in mind but I still tend to stagger nails. On a related note I was also taught that dressing screws is bad practice too. Looks nice but results in some screws being under torqued and others over torqued.

But back to the question -40mm nails.
 
50mm galvanised, if you must use 40mm defo use ring shanks (sharedised) If the boards warp they'll pull 40mm nails out, less likely with 50mm
 
First picture is the way to do it, so that each board is held with a nail at the thick edge, and trapped by the thick edge of the next board at the thin edge. Do not nail through 2 boards at once or the boards will split, as they can't move when they expand/contract with the seasons.
40mm ring shank nails are fine for this, they won't come out with movement. You don't need to overlap the boards more than 25mm, any more is a waste of wood (unless your featheredge is 150mm or wider)
 
you might like to make yourself a spacer in the shape of a T from 2" offcuts.One nailed onto the other.The top of the T lodges against the previous featherboard. The leg which you have previously measured, stops the next featherboard from getting closer than 3 1/2 ".
 

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