Fixing timber frames to interior brick wall for floating bench.

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Hey,

Been reading a lot online and I originally thought it would be a simple answer but doesn't seem like it.

What screw would I be best off using for fixing wood frames to the brick wall so it can support a persons weight (or 2)?

Leaning towards regular frame fixings but others are mentioning just using concrete screws or thunderbolts or rawlplugs.

20211030_105231.jpg


The idea is to have it be a floating bench in the alcove (137cm length by 33.5cm depth)
 
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Hi,

For fixing a frame into brick, you are lucky to have a huge range of options and prices, and that might cause some confusion!
For me (especially if holding people), I would use some anchor bolts, or resin and threaded fixngs - towards the more expensive end of the scale, but will never fall off! :)
 
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Hi,

For fixing a frame into brick, you are lucky to have a huge range of options and prices, and that might cause some confusion!
For me (especially if holding people), I would use some anchor bolts, or resin and threaded fixngs - towards the more expensive end of the scale, but will never fall off! :)

Ah nice, if I understood correctly then something like this should work?

Is there a min distance that a bolt should be in the wall?

Thanks for the help!

Screenshot_20211030-112257_Screwfix.jpg
 
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from the look of it there are 3 possible danger area that need to be ruled out as in 50mm dead space above any socket in case the wire goes up the wall

i would personally treat it as a storage area with a split lid and split cushion on the top
this allows you to move the cushion onto the other half and lift the lid for access
you can even remove the cushion one side and use that side as a table or just flat area
 
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I shouldn't be making assumptions! :)

Assumption one, was that the OP meant the frame went on all 3 sides.

Assumption two, was that the white socket was telephone/cable coming in from outside. I'm still fairly confident with that one ;)

But, you have made me see the power supply on the floor is plugged into an unseen socket on the chimney breast.
 
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The idea was as follows:

1. The bench would be slightly higher than the rough example in the post description.

2. The bench would be about 10-15cm above sockets but ofcourse id be extra cautious with any area there. There is a socket that's quite low hidden behind the breast. I'm quite sure it comes from above near the ceiling.

3. The bench would have all 3 sides of the wall to support the weight off. Id add frames to left, right and back section of the wall.

4. The bench would be floating. I have a rough render of what I thought it might look like below. Though idk if that's the final design for everything but thoughts are welcome

Screenshot_20211030-163950_WhatsApp.jpg
 
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I shouldn't be making assumptions! :)

Assumption one, was that the OP meant the frame went on all 3 sides.

Assumption two, was that the white socket was telephone/cable coming in from outside. I'm still fairly confident with that one ;)

But, you have made me see the power supply on the floor is plugged into an unseen socket on the chimney breast.
yes indeed and whilst most are likley to go down or indeed outside mr sod makes the rules to catch us out :rolleyes::D
 
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Something like this may be more suitable:

https://www.toolstation.com/shield-anchor-projecting-bolt/p42414

The projecting stud can be bolted through the frame.

The 40 X 55mm, means a 55mm deep hole is drilled, and the thread will project 40mm.

This is just my opinion, stick around and I'm sure you will get others! :)


Thanks i went online (and actually to the shop to take a look for myself) and It looks very promising. Seems like a good fit for purpose.

Looked at these or variation of these (90mm) because my timber would be 2x3(37mm thick)
Screenshot_20211030-165652_Screwfix.jpg
 
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Looked at these or variation of these (90mm) because my timber would be 2x3(37mm thick)

I would be happy with those, as long as you use enough of them, although I bow to the experts opinions :)

M10's may be better?

More fixings can always be added later, if you find it unstable.
And if the anchor bolts were to fail, the holes can still be reused for resin anchors.

Although looking at the distance to span, I can imagine some flex in the middle of the seat, unless the frame was absolutely rigid.
 
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I shouldn't be making assumptions! :)

Assumption one, was that the OP meant the frame went on all 3 sides.
I think I'd say that assumption one was that the masonry was of good quality. My experience with older brickwork (Edwardian and earlier) is that it can be incredibly ropey - if so it makes Thunderbolts a non-starter and can give you problems with shield anchors. So resin anchors make a lot more sense to me, but maybe I've just had too many bad experiences?
 
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I think I'd say that assumption one was that the masonry was of good quality. My experience with older brickwork (Edwardian and earlier) is that it can be incredibly ropey - if so it makes Thunderbolts a non-starter and can give you problems with shield anchors. So resin anchors make a lot more sense to me, but maybe I've just had too many bad experiences?
Good point,
I have rubble filled stone walls; resin fixings are the only choice, and they work very well! :)
 
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Ah I believe this house is 1950s but how do resin fixings work out of curiosity?

What kind of screw is needed? I'll do some research.
 
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