Floating floor joist above boiler flue.

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Hi all,

I’m currently renovating my kitchen in a house I have only lived in for 6 months. I’ve taken the plaster off the wall and have found that for whatever reason, there is a floor joist right above the boiler flue that doesn’t have any support whatsoever.

I’m wondering if the only option I have is to remove the boiler flue, block it up properly and then core drill and put the flue back on.

someone has suggested attaching a joist hanger to it and noggins between the floating joist and the ones either side but it sounds like a bodge to me.

My question is: is my only option taking the flue off, blocking it up, then core drilling? Or can I do something temporary, as that wall will be coming down in a few years for an extension.
 
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So to be clear???

The boiler flue goes out through an external wall.

The wall has been core drilled to allow the flue to pass

BUT the core hole has left the floor joist hanging in fresh air??
 
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So to be clear???

The boiler flue goes out through an external wall.

The wall has been core drilled to allow the flue to pass

BUT the core hole has left the floor joist hanging in fresh air??

It looks like it was never core drilled. Just bashed out then bricked up on the outside but essentially left alone on the inside. I have attached a photo. You can see 2 pieces of mild steel being used as a “support”
 

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That's fairly shoddy, try and find out who fitted the boiler and make sure you never use them again.
On the plus side it doesn't appear to have moved (more luck than design), if the wall wasn't coming down I'd suggest cutting the wall end off that floating joist, fixing a trimmer between the joists either side & then hanger on the end of the floater to the trimmer- but as it is a couple of tight-fitting noggins between floater and the others will do, and don't put any massive point loads on the floor above (it won't collapse but it might sag a bit)
 
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Could you fix a piece of timber the same depth as the joist on the block to the right of the unsupported joust and then put a few 'L' brackets to fix the two together?
 
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Could you fix a piece of timber the same depth as the joist on the block to the right of the unsupported joust and then put a few 'L' brackets to fix the two together?

good shout. I can definitely do this on one side. It’s just the other side then. I am starting to wonder if a joist hanger is the best option then noggins just off the wall
 
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Fit a steel angle bracket on the right of the joist. Fill the hole with pink foam.
 
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That is a shocking mess...

I would get a bit of steel angle made up, cut and welded to support that joist by it's two neighbours. Around 60x60x5 mm angle, cut and welded to form a U bracket, the sides of which would span to the outer faces of the two neighbouring joists, then drilled and bolted through with 10mm bolts, two per joist. The angle can be set flat against both the wall and the timber. Any metalworker should be able to make the bracket up for you - I could knock up from stock here in 30 minutes.
 
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I would just knock out half a block each side of the existing gap and bridge across with something reasonably strong (RC/Wood/Steel).
Pack out with slate shims of you need too.

I'd then backfill the remaining gap to stop draughts.
 
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