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Future proofing home/making smart with technology

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by Fordy81, 4 Apr 2019.

  1. Fordy81

    Fordy81

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    Wasn't quite sure where to put this!

    Basically we are moving in to a new house probably next month and it all needs updating. While floorboards are up and walls not plastered, I was thinking about how to 'future proof' the house.

    I guess smart homes are just the way things are going whether I like it or not, so what can I do?

    I don't really have much clue but I'm always hearing about Nest, and Ring and smart appliances.

    What would everyone else do? Ethernet cables and sockets into every room, especially bedrooms? Is that such a thing?

    Basically I'm trying to get a grip of what might need to be hidden to make things easier of the coming years!

    Thanks very much

    Read more: https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/...g-smart-with-technology.521001/#ixzz5k7ZPa3Z6
     
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  3. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    always a tricky one as the technology you're talking about may not have been built yet.
    When my mate did something similar by the time he was ready to use it, the tech had moved on.

    ensuring that some ducts exist with string runs in them that allow access across rooms without lifting the floor would help.
     
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  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Think the effort and money required out ways any benifits.
     
  5. stealthwolf

    stealthwolf

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    A lot of the smart devices are wireless so ethernet cable not needed as much. Depending on wifi strength and signal in the house, I'd consider at least one upstairs ethernet port for an additional router. Wireless boosters are about but can be a bit hit-an-miss. Definitely more power sockets per room.

    If I were to buy my current house now and be able to rip it up, I'd ramp up the number of power sockets in each room (bedrooms have 1 single or double socket only), as well as put in ethernet sockets to reduce gaming lag. I'd also put in wiring for security cameras and alarms or just get them fitted now.
     
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  6. Fordy81

    Fordy81

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    Thanks. Completely forgot about CCTV. Ethernet upstairs is going to be a must I think. Two kids, god knows how many appliances connected.
     
  7. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Have over 30 devices in the home , all but 2 use WiFi without any major problems .
     
  8. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Avoid wireless and use cable as much as you can

    When you neighbour upgrades their system with a booster you may find your WiFi is compromised by his increased power. So you have to install a booster. His system is then compromised by your increased power and he gets anothe booster...... War of the boosters.
     
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  9. Chud

    Chud

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    I'd run some cat6 cable from a convenient central point (needs power, under stairs etc) to about 3 or 4 points in the house - I'd also consider making a cable access point on the outside so that you can hook up a garden office without too much trouble.

    Decide where you want your main router to sit and run RJ11 cable from there to where your master phone socket is - also run another piece of CAT6 from where the main router is to where your central cabling point will be (if different).

    Yes most stuff is wireless now but the trend is to go for MESH type wifi that is fast but individual hubs are low powered meaning range isn't great per individual device, this is one of the ways that manufacturers are getting around congestion within the wifi spectrum. MESH works great when you have lots of MESH devices, if like me, you only have 1 or 2 it's limitations become quickly apparent...e.g. Sky customer, Sky HD boxes but fibre Max broadband - your wifi could be a bit sucky. SkyQ customer with 1 hub and 2 mini boxes - no wifi issues.

    Ducting is a good idea but my experience of trying it at home is that it's fine for straight runs but the minute any kind of bend comes into play and you're in trouble - as someone else said effort may outweigh benefits.
     
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  11. foxhole

    foxhole

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    That’s why there are many channels to avoid interference .
     
  12. SpecialK

    SpecialK

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    Neutrals in light switches for smart switches.
    Ethernet to a point above top floor and bottom floor ceilings for access points (ubiquiti/tplink eap)
    Ethernet cables going to a central point for a large switch / media server.
    Ethernet(s) to behind TV / any media player (bedroom etc) and office?
    Possible places for zigbee network extenders if you choose that for smart devices.
    Ethernet cables for cctv in place.
    Power for a doorbell/ethernet cable
    Zones for central heating.
    Possibly cables by radiators for powered radiator valves wired back to a central point for control.
     
  13. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    The channels in the 2.4 GHz band used for WiFi are separated by 5 MHz but have a bandwidth of 22 MHz so overlap each other.

    1 overlaps 2 and 3
    2 overlaps 1, 3 and 4
    3 overlaps 1, 2, 4 and 5

    and so on upto

    9 overlaps 7, 8, 10 and 11
    10 overlaps 8, 9 and 11
    11 overlaps 9 and 10

    Channels 1, 6 and 11 do not overlap with each other.

    When channels from different location overlap the strongest signal will ( in nost cases ) be the one the receiver "listens" to. This tends to mean the closest transmitter will be the one that is "heard" but that assumes the transmitters are equal in radiated power.
     
  14. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Tend to use 5ghz wifi much less interfernce.
     
  15. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Agree that 5GHz is better but I don't have the channel allocation / bandwidth data so cannot comment. I seem to recall that there is no bandwidth overlap so ( given that items are compliant ) interference from other systems provided they are not on the same channel will be unlikely.
     
  16. Ian H

    Ian H

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    Fit a lock on your bedroom door.
     
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  17. opps

    opps

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    You seem to have overlooked channels 12 and 13. So long as one doesn't have American visitors with Apple products, channels 12 and 13 are fine to use.
     
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