Galaxy Aqua Digitemp Pumped Version

Joined
15 Oct 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Hello All.
Please can someone help. I have a Galaxy Aqua Digitemp pumped version which works pretty well almost all the time. Every so often, though, it seems to run out of water. When that happens, I can’t hear the pump whining, but there’s no water flow. Both hot and cold water are still available through the (non-pumped) taps, so I know that there’s water available.
I can’t determine any regular “thing” that would trigger this, as it is completely random.
It seems to me that (perhaps) the system gets air in it somehow but, not knowing anything at all about plumbing, I may be completely wrong.
If anyone out there can assist with this problem, I shall be most appreciative and grateful.
Many thanks.
 
Joined
2 May 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Hi Ron

I'm not sure if this will help, but there is a function on your Digitemp remote control to get the base unit to go through an "air bleed" cycle. It's described in detail in the Installation Guide pdf (I Googled it and found the download site https://documents.pub/document/galaxy-digital-mixers.html a few days ago). It basically says this:

- Make sure the power to the base unit has been on for LESS than 5 minutes.
For remotes with 2 x programable buttons at the top
- Press P1 and P2 together for at least 3 seconds.
For remotes with 3 x programable buttons at the top
- Press P1 and P3 together for at least 3 seconds.
- “C” will appear on the remote control and the shower will automatically bleed out any air.
- The automatic bleed process takes 2 minutes to complete. During this time the internal pump
will switch on twice for about 10 seconds and water should come out of the shower handset.
- If water does not flow from the shower at the end of the bleed process, then press the program
buttons again, as shown, for 3 seconds.
- After 2 minutes the unit automatically switches off.
Once started, the bleed process can be stopped at any time by pressing the Start / Stop button.

I had to do this after draining my system (un-necessarily it appears now) to install a new central heating pump. The shower worked fine once, then started making weird noises and water stopped coming out.

I'm not sure you actually need to do that first step of powering off the base unit. Give it a try without first to save the hassle.

Unfortunately for me, my remote and the base unit have since lost their pairing, which I think may have had more to do with low batteries and trying to reset/re-pair but not sure... If you found anyone with experience of these showers I'd be grateful if you could put me in touch!

Good luck
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
15 Oct 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Hi Vitch,
Thanks very much for your message, and detailed information. I have actually seen that process in the user manual, but had wondered if that would be the right thing to do, as it seemed to indicate being done when installing the system, or after working on it it. Mine works just fine 99% of the time, but every now and then throws a bit of a wobbly. Following your message, though, I’ll give this process a try the next time the system misbehaves. If I do find someone who knows all about this system, I’ll be sure to let you know. Thanks again for your kind response.
 
Joined
2 May 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
No problem. I think it's a procedure to use if you somehow get air into the base unit's pump, which won't do it any good if it's on. It seems to just open the solenoid valves to let water flow under gravity, then pump a bit and repeat. I certainly did have air in my pipes and had to do this a few times to get it all out.

Thinking about your problem though, it could just be that you are running out of water. There may be several reasons or combinations... Here are my thoughts and a few tests to help narrow things down.

These power showers can pump out a LOT of water in a short time. It comes from your cold water tank and hot water tank. The hot water tank is supplied by the same cold water tank. So, if the mains water feed, through the ballcock into your cold water tank is slower than your shower is pumping it out, you will run out of water at some point.

My mains water pressure is pretty high but it's not like that across the country and it can vary from time to time. Neighbourhood usage can spike if everyone puts the kettle on during adverts on TV, dropping pressure, or more likely, having a shower before work. The water company may drop pressure for maintenance work. Any of this can mean your water inflow isn't as fast as normal.

Or, it could be something in your house. Your washing machine being on or someone else drawing water.

When you said "non-pumped" taps worked, remember that there's quite a bit of water in the pipes leading to the taps. That would have to be drained before you could tell if it's being replenished or not.

When my system had air in it, you could hear the motor speed up dramatically before the water stopped coming out. That may be a clue.

You could check how long the shower was on for when it seemed to run out. Clearly a long one uses more. I noticed in the manual that you should only run for a maximum of 15 minutes anyway, and not have another for 45 minutes, just to stop the pump from overheating. I must have a word with my daughter about that...

There's a flow rate adjustment on the remote. There's also a "Max Flow Rate enable" switch by the batteries on the remote. If this only happens 1% of the time, you could be just about balanced between mains water in and shower water out, with the occasional overstep. By using the presets on the remote with one lower flow setting, it might never happen again.

The last thing, after all else fails, I'd check your cold water tank and cistern in the loft to see if the valve or outflow pipe is working freely. I only say this because as a young lad, living away from home in a room in a country house, my housemate and I were surprised when water started pouring through the ceiling while we were watching TV. It was coming from the loft, so up I went. By torchlight, I found the problem floating in the cold water tank. A bat had fallen in, drowned, decomposed somewhat and blocked the overflow pipe. The cistern wasn't closing properly and it was floating, drawn to the outlet. If the cistern hadn't failed, the carcass would probably have sunk and been drawn over the outlet pipe.

Yuk. I thought it was just dead leaves at first.

And on that note, I bid you goodnight :)

Cheers
Vitch
 
Sponsored Links
Top