Garden gate problem

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by moore005004, 19 Oct 2020.

  1. moore005004

    moore005004

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    Hi Guys,
    I have a problem with my back garden gate that needs to be replaced (see picture) the 3"x4" upright wooden post that the gate is attached to sits in the recess of a concrete post. The upright has now come off to reveal that whoever had the house before us had the post fastened with just rawl plugs and screws. The concrete fence post does not have any holes going all the way through to attach bolts. I don't really want to remove all the gravel boards, but I would if no alternative. Do you think it is possible to drill straight through the concrete post? I'm not sure as I believe they are strengthened with iron rods, any feedback would be much appreciated gate inside.jpg gate outside.jpg
     
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  3. footprints

    footprints

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    You can drill a concrete post must have a good SDS drill though. the bars usually run in a U shape so drilling at the centre will with luck miss them.
     
  4. moore005004

    moore005004

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    Cheers that is helpful advice, unfortunately think I am going to have to remove the gravel boards to do so, thanks for the advice
     
  5. JohnD

    JohnD

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    concrete posts can crack or spall, so go through with your smallest possible masonry bit first, then open it up gradually. Be very gentle in the last half inch or so.

    SDS+ will be easy, a hammer drill will be rather tedious.

    I use stainless studding and flange nuts for this kind of job. Some people say BZP is sufficient.
     
  6. footprints

    footprints

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  7. moore005004

    moore005004

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    thanks for your help guys that gives me a few options :)
     
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  9. conny

    conny

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    If you put studding all the way through the post you may have difficulty getting the slabs back in due to the nut on that side.
    Using the resin method mentioned above may be your best bet and will save removing the slabs.
     
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  10. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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  11. moore005004

    moore005004

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    good idea unfortunately my upright wooden post fitts on the inside of concrete post just looked at all available brackets and none fit inside, but thanks for the ideas
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    For that, you can use a sleeve nut, where only a small dome like the head of a screw projects. It is best to slip a washer under the head to prevent it pulling through. They are also useful on gates, looking neat when exposed.

    Grease it very thoroughly before fitting. The hole has to be big enough for the sleeve, which is bigger than the studding.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Socket-headed sleeve nuts are often found on bedframes as they do not project and catch your leg, but the bedframe ones are cheap metal and will rust outdoors.

    I have not used the resin fixing, but it sounds like it could save a lot of work.
     
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  13. moore005004

    moore005004

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    thanks for the advice, good idea
     
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