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Garden & Shed Lighting - Ireland

Discussion in 'Electrics Outside of the UK' started by snaffles, 17 Apr 2009.

  1. snaffles

    snaffles

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    I'm attempting to install some garden pillar lights and a shed light.

    The pillar lights should all be run from one switch, and the shed light should have its own switch in the shed.


    I understand how to connect the pillar lights so that they are all attached to one cable. I also understand how the shed light should be wired.


    My problem is where to get my electrical supply from.

    I had intended to tap into an existing lighting circuit at an existing switch, and get my supply from an existing light switch.

    I have since been informed that this won't work - as the existing switch doesn't cater for a neutral wire and I need a supply with Live, Neutral and Earth.


    I would like to know, if it's possible to run these lights from a cable that runs to an existing socket.


    I am reluctant to run it from an existing ceiling rose, as I want to avoid chasing wires around under floorboards.

    Many thanks in advance for any assistance you may be able to offer.
     
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  3. wingcoax

    wingcoax

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    You must fit a FCU connected to your socket as a spur, downrate to a 3a fuse and run your lights from this. If same rules apply over there you must also notify LBA.
     
  4. solair

    solair

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    It actually breeches the Irish wiring regulations to connect directly to a socket circuit as lighting and socket circuits are supposed to be kept separate.

    You can use a fused connection unit, as described, and a 3amp fuse. However it is not normal practice.

    An electrician would normally install a new 6 or 10 amp circuit to feed the lights.

    Outdoor electrics should also be connected via a 30mA RCD. This would apply to pillar lights. There are extra safety requirements for outdoor electrical fittings as they are outside the house's equipotential zone and also are in a wet environment.

    Your socket circuits are more than likely RCD protected if your home was wired after 1979.
     
  5. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


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