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How best to repair this. Tiled floor caved in! Help!

Discussion in 'Building' started by neds, 7 May 2008.

  1. neds

    neds

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    Right basically take a look at this:

    [​IMG]

    This is the sight of my front porch entrance. Directly below this is my cellar. I have had a little look directly under and all i could see was a rotten sort of joist which held up the plaster right beneath that floor. I couldn't see what was holding the floor up. that rotten joist wasn't taken the load of the floor though. so must be beyond this plaster...

    Basically part of the floor is caving in, but I cant work out whats holding the floor up in the first place. I'm assuming it may be some joist running along it, but cant actually see this from underneath.

    Any tips on how best to tackle this, I know this may mean ripping the whole floor out which is a shame.

    Cheers!
     
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  3. neds

    neds

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    Anyone?
     
  4. noseall

    noseall

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    you seem to have answered your own question. ;)

    logically, the best way to tackle the problem will be from above.

    remove and store the tiles, having photographed them first.

    remove sub floor material, then re-build the floor, rectifying any items along the way.
     
  5. neds

    neds

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    Yeah cheers. I thought to do the job properly the floor had probably have to come up. I'm just not sure what I will find below it or how to reinforce it. Could i do a similar set up to any normal wodden floor, i.e get some 2" by 4" across the edge and then screw down some reclaimed floor boards across it then tile on top of that. I hope this will be enough to withstand the daily abuse.
     
  6. kingandy2nd

    kingandy2nd

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    As well as taking lots of photographs of your tiles before you take them up I would suggest that you get some chalk and number all the tiles working from left to right.

    The photographs will ensure you get the general pattern right, and the numbering will ensure that exactly the same tile returns to the same place.

    It might see like a bit of extra work, but if the tiles aren’t all cut to the same sizes across the whole floor it will save you a lot of time when you don’t have to piece the jigsaw back together from scratch.
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    better than floorboards would be WBP ply (this is very water resistant).

    It is very strong and rigid, and not prone to expanding/contracting with the weather like floorboards (which would tend to loosen your tiling)

    18mm is most often used, but 25mm is better

    It will also give you a safe surface to walk over until you get round to retiling.

    As the old joist seems rotten, have a look at ventilation and any particular sources of damp. In a house like yours there is usually ventilation under the front door sill, either 20mm holes or an iron grille. I expect it is choked with dust and cobwebs, preventing ventilation. It may also be that the concrete path outside has been put in too high and is blocking ventilation and bridging DPC (if any)

    If the porch floor is concrete. modern techniques and materials will allow you to do a better job which should last another hundred years :)

    It would be interesting to see some pics as you go :)
     
  8. neds

    neds

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    Thanks guys, got the materials today. Going to use some 2"x4" for the wall plate anchored in with rawlbolts. Got some 2" flooring maybe overkill but at least it will be sturdy! Will run another joist structure across the middle to bear more of the weight of the boards. That should all hold up tight. I'm just dreading the re-tiling! I got some 1/4" ply spare from the tiled bathroom floor. I may stick that on top of the boards and tile on top of that.

    Will have another look at the ventilation side of things too John.

    Will get some pics If I remember! :D
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    maybe a bit of DPM between the wall-plate and the wall will keep the damp off.
     
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  11. neds

    neds

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    Excellent idea will try that too. Could I get away with using some DPC instead as I have some laying about. Not sure the difference between the two.
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    thick black polythene folded round the wood where it is against the wall, doesn't matter what it was sold as IMO.
     
  13. joe-90

    joe-90

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    Use some pressure treated CCA timber.
     
  14. gregers

    gregers

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    you will probably find that the wall plate has been built into the wall,and no doubt the outside is a lot higher,i would defo wrap any new plate with dpc ,or you could brick up the gap and install hangers eliminating any timber in the wall,marine ply would be even better then wpb but its very expensive,make sure you get the floor heights correct etc .
     
  15. neds

    neds

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    OK thanks. Little bit worried about the long term rot problem. I'll do the best I can when anchoring the wall plate however since this is directly below the cellar which is pretty damp worried about the state of the timber after time. Is there anything I can use to prevent or prolong the life of the timber?
     
  16. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Cuprinol Green wood preserver. Wonderful stuff. Apply it after cutting and drilling so that all surfaces are treated. Either immerse, or apply several flowing coats, each before the previous has dried, so it soaks in. the 5-litre can is better value than the small ones. Wear gloves and protect your skin and eyes :eek:

    The solvent smells a bit so it will dry better if you leave it outside in the sun and air for a few days after treatment.
     
  17. neds

    neds

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    Thanks. I read about this stuff before. What I will do is chop the timbers to manageable lengths beforehand and paint them and leave them a couple of days. This wont get done till next week anyway so have enough time. Then just touch up the areas that have been trimmed/drilled.

    I'm assuming this clear stuff is the same as the dyed green one?

    http://www.screwfix.com/prods/65235...r;jsessionid=V34ANOJTATMXKCSTHZOCFEY?ts=64599
     
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