HOW ROUGH?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by ladylola, 28 Dec 2009.

  1. ladylola

    ladylola

    Joined:
    19 Dec 2009
    Messages:
    3,314
    Thanks Received:
    289
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I was talking a few weeks ago to a couple of joiners from Manchester who had spent a little while house bumping. They were saying that their experience had been an eyeopener for a number of reasons.
    One reason was the levels of quality or lack of that was expected. They were fitting skirtings and architraves and when one of them took out a plane to improve a mitre they were surprised to be told to just nail it on any gaps can be left to the decorater!
    Funnily enough the decorater that is working with us at the moment was actually surprised that we as joiners (or carpenters depending on where you live) were even using sandpaper.
    I've not had any experience of house bumping myself and little of new build as a whole, Ive said in another post that most of my work is in restoration, but are these attitudes common and if they are do people feel that they are right? I do of course understand the arguments about people being on a price.
    The chat did take me back to my days as an apprentice. One day at college the lecturer showed us, BUT "Ive not taught you this", the hammer round mitre joint. Used mainly for 3" bullnose skirtings in council houses, it involves using a hammer on the external mitres of skirtings that don't mate up to "close up" any gap!
    Anyone else know of other such trade secrets to be as rough as a badgers arse?
     
  2. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
  3. Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page