How times have changed with timber quality

Discussion in 'Trade Talk' started by gardener1214388, 10 Jun 2014.

  1. gardener1214388

    gardener1214388

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    Some years ago; one timber importer rep came to see me and told me how he had just been to Siberia on a holiday of a lifetime; visiting a Siberian logging site; he told me he saw stacks of lengths of 2 ft square; straight 24 feet long Redwood timber and the last time he only saw that was pre war WW2. When he asked why we did not have this in the UK; he was told; the British won't pay for quality; most of it goes to Japan and Spain; the British importers only buy branch stock; how many times have you looked at the end of a bit of 3 x 9 Redwood and seen growth rings; Branch stock.

    Then one day I had another timber rep visit promoting the latest idea; Whitewood timber for joinery.

    I remember with an old Boxwood Jack plane with a bit of 2x6 in the vice going down it running off one full shaving; not one shake or knot to be seen; those were the days when we had good timber.

    How times have changed.
     
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  3. gregers

    gregers

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    you can still get it,its just its very 'expensive' :cry:
     
  4. LJ1

    LJ1

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    Think this just furthers the image that British people (in general) like a good bargain, even if it isn't the better option. I get some people might not be able to afford the better quality, but I'm sure that some people just get the cheaper stuff because they see it as a "bargain".

    Sad really :(
     
  5. D_Hailsham

    D_Hailsham

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    "Solid Oak" dining tables with the top made from hundreds of strips about two inches wide and six inches long all glued together.

    False Description or what? One for Trading Standards.
     
  6. LJ1

    LJ1

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    Well it isn't liquid or gas and it is still oak... ;)
     
  7. Whitespirit66

    Whitespirit66

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    Changing tack slightly - where do B&Q get their timber from? I usually buy from my local merchant, who offers quality timber and good service.

    Recently, I just needed a couple of lengths of planed timber, and couldn't be bothered to go to the merchants in town. Went to local B&Q and was shocked at the low quality of the wood. Split down the middle, curved, warped - couldn't find anything that would result in a quality finished end product.

    How do they manage such low standards in their timber
     
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  9. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    In 1980 the structural timber for the house we built ( Walter Segal post and beam method ) was knot free Douglas Fir or Oregon Pine. The main post were 21 feet long which was a challenge for the importer but they found them

    About 10 years later we extended and we found we could not get the same quality as before without a long delay and massive increase in price ( well above inflation ).

    Some of the "timber" in the DIY sheds today seems to have the strength, density and durability of balsa wood.
     
  10. AronSearle

    AronSearle

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    Fact is we just chopped down lots of the first growth wood, the siberian pine is imported here as its quality, people do want it, but not everyone can afford it. Slow grown softwood just isnt as commonly available worldwide as it used to be as most of it has gone, and what is left is protected.

    Lots of specially plantation grown hardwoods coming onto the market, smaller trees, but still good timber as they carefully select species appropriate to it and growing methods.

    Bit of rose tinted spectacles going on in this thread?
     
  11. Danoil

    Danoil

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    We have been conditioned over the last twenty years or so to think that cheap is good, when to my mind a bargain is something I want/ need at the best quality I can afford. My grandad always said "buy cheap, buy twice" and I've proved him right enough times in the past to do it again now.
     
  12. LJ1

    LJ1

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    I've never heard that quote before, but it's definitely true! It's always worth paying a bit more for the extra quality...
     
  13. gregers

    gregers

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    use mdf your be fine, ;) ;)
     
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