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How to change brake discs on a Vauxhall Corsa C 1.4 16v?

Discussion in 'Car Repairs / Maintenance' started by Tomsking, 8 Aug 2008.

  1. Tomsking

    Tomsking

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    I need to change the discs on my corsa can any one instructed me on how to do this?

    Thank You

    Tom
     
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  3. johnwr

    johnwr

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    Jack up the car and put on axle stands with the handbrake firmly on.
    Remove the wheels, remove the pads, take off the caliper bridge. Remove the disc, clean up the drive flange until it's clean and shiney. Clean the new disc with brake cleaner and fit to the drive flange and refit the screw, replace the caliper bridge and tighten the bolts to the correct torque setting. Press back the piston into the caliper, being careful that the fluid dosen't overflow, fit the new pads, fasten the caliper to the bridge, pump the pedal a few times and if it feels solid with very little travel you can go to the other side and do the same, when every thing seems OK then it will be a good time to change the brake fluid.
    I hope this helps.
     
  4. Tomsking

    Tomsking

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    Thank you for your reply.....
    How will i know what the correct torque setting is? Im a complete amateur at this. And how do i put the piston back in without the fluid overflowing?

    Thanks again

    Tom
     
  5. Stivino

    Stivino

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    You can either take the top of the master cylinder reservoir when you're pushing back the pistons, wrap a rag round the reservoir to catch any overspill. Or, slacken the bleed nipple, attach a tube to it and catch the displaced fluid in your bleed bottle while pushing back.
    I don't know the torque. I've never torqued them, I just make them FT.
     
  6. johnwr

    johnwr

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    Sorry about that, the torque setting is 95nm. If you clamp off the flexi hose with a pipe clamp and put a bleeder tube on the bleed nipple and open the nipple about half a turn you will be able to press the piston back in and the fluid will go into a jar and not all over the paint (bad news). If you do spill any fluid, was it off with water.
     
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  8. m4lcy129051

    m4lcy129051

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    [

    if you phone you local vauxhall centre they will be happy to tell you the torc settings be carefull with the bridge bolts as they can be very tight you will need a 10mm allan key for the brige and a 7mm allan key for the caliper remember to change the pads at the same time as the discs use your old pad and a g clamp to push the piston back
     
  9. jeremy hughes

    jeremy hughes

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    From my experience on Peugeots, however it cannot be very different.

    1 Loosen wheel nuts.

    2. Jack car up and then remove the wheels.

    3. Wrap old cloth around the brake fluid reservior, and remove the cap.

    4. Remove the brake pads, and push the piston in the caliper fully home. This is when you may get spillage of the fluid out the brake fluid reservior.

    5. Undo the brake caliper bolts to the hub, and support the caliper.

    6. Undo the brake disc screws, I have found that using an impact driver on these to be very helpful. It may also be a good idea to get new brake disc screws as the heads are prone to rounding.

    7. Remove the disc, it may need a tap with a hammer, but usually they will almost fall off, then clean the hub to disc mating face.

    8. Place new disc on (perhaps with a smear of copper grease) and do up the disc screws. Now I normally just do these up hand tight and have never had a problem.

    9. Re-fitting is the reverse of removal, however I would again use copper grease on al the nuts and bolts, as this helps if you later then need to take it all apart again at a later date. As for torque setting I usually make sure everything is done up really tight by hand, however this is up to you and you may wish to use the manufactures torque setting. It is unlikely that you will have got air in the brake fluid so unlikely that they will need to be bled, however take it easy to start with to allow the breaks to bed in.

    N.B. You should always put in new pads (with a smear of copper grease on the back of the pads. DO NOT GET THE GREASE ON THE PAD TO DISC AREA) with new discs, however that is up to you.
     
  10. hamish83

    hamish83

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    dose anyone know what type of bolts are on the break caliper arm because having problem removing them to replace disks on mk2 corsa
     
  11. xerxes

    xerxes

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    When fitting new discs, don't forget to clean off all the protective coating on the braking surfaces first with a solvent. I use methylated spirits.
     
  12. m4lcy129051

    m4lcy129051

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    they are 10mm alan key bolts they can be tight so buy the corect tool for the job
     
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