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How to identify Artex?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Jaaaayb123, 10 Jun 2018.

  1. Jaaaayb123

    Jaaaayb123

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    Hello, I recently bought my first house and my dad accidentally put his foot through the ceiling whilst in the loft. I’m concerned this is Artex and contains asbestos? The house was built in the 1930s so chances are it is... panicked slightly! The ceiling was fixed by a plasterer so I can’t have it tested but I’ve inserted some images. What do you think?
     

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  3. Nige F

    Nige F

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    I don't know when Artex was invented but a 1930's house would have been plastered then the Artex done sometime later. How did the plasterer fix it ? They usually plaster over the lot.
     
  4. Jaaaayb123

    Jaaaayb123

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    Yes he did just plaster of the lot, but I’m concerned about it being disturbed and now being airborne?
     
  5. Nige F

    Nige F

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    Looking at the cracks and bearing in mind the surface is painted, if it was old artex the risk of fibres is tiny. To be honest I can't tell from the photos if it is artex or another stipple finish - like polyripple etc. There are other threads re: artex testing etc. If other ceilings have been done you could have them tested. I personally would not worry about it.
     
  6. ic1927

    ic1927

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    From memory (and I maybe wrong here) artex was around in the USA back in the 1930's but wasn't introduced to Britain until the 1960's. My old man told me this years ago and he used to teach people to artex back in the 60's.
     
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  8. opps

    opps

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    Artex contained white asbestos until the 1980's

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artex

    I have no idea how much and would imagine that most of us have been exposed to it at some point over our lives. Whilst not wanting to make light of your concerns, it may well be the case that the diesel particulates and dust from car tires and brakes are more likely to be detrimental to your health in the longer term.

    You could hire a class M vacuum cleaner if you are worried.

    http://www.envirogard.co.uk/products.htm?sm=351

    I have no idea how you dispose of the bag and filter though. Personally I wouldn't lose sleep over it.
     
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  9. ic1927

    ic1927

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    That's where it gets confusing. The company trading as Artex did remove the asbestos around 1983 and replaced it with a product called Artex AX, I think it was. But some of the other companies who made the same type of product, ie Suretex, Wondertex, Clintex, were still using asbestos up until the late nineties and beyond.
     
  10. The stuff in your original photo is plasterboard, so not the original 30's ceiling, which would have been lath and plaster.
     
  11. cwhaley

    cwhaley

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    Probably lathe and plaster, but potentially plasterboard. I have been in a house with original plasterboard ceilings from the 1920s and so far as I know it was in fairly wide usage from just after WWI onward.

    I wouldn't be concerned with this. It's doubtful there would have been any harm caused by damaging that ceiling and even if it did contain fibres it is now sealed back up and not a concern. It's only going to be a concern if you ever decide to start works that involve ripping the ceiling down.
     
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