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How to replace a straight piece of drainage pipe (e.g. 110mm)?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by d000hg, 11 Nov 2019.

  1. d000hg

    d000hg

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    We fear we may have cracked/damaged a run of underground pipe coming from our septic tank into the drainage field. Some groundworks were being done and the trench (900mm) has filled up with nasty water... without wading in we can't tell if that's a damaged pipe or just the thing working as it's supposed to underground.

    Advice on that welcome, BUT my question is, if you have a straight length of drainage pipe you need to repair, how can you do this? The pipe is very rigid and the push-connectors take quite a bit of pipe inside so how can you physically get a straight bit of pipe between two connecters? Are there any tricks of the trade here, or connectors made for this sort of scenario when you're not laying everything new and are confined?
     
  2. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    If it plastic pipe, use a 'Slip Coupling', these do not have the stops inside so can be slid fully over one section of pipe, then pulled back over the adjoining section to make a joint. Just ensure you use plenty of pipe jointing lubricant to ensure the seals dont snag. If it's Clayware, 'Fernco' couplings should do the job.

    As for the water, given the rainfall of late, the water table is probably quite high, so possible the leach field isn't draining very well. Been out to empty tanks before now that were filling back up almost as fast as I was pumping out, due to the outfall acting as a land drain.
     
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  4. d000hg

    d000hg

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    I never heard of those, sounds very useful - thanks.

    It turns out the digger had indeed gone through the pipe! But just as we were getting worried the chap turned up with a spade, jumped in the poo-trench and connected a new piece. Phew!
     
  5. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    I would reckon if they had a £ for every time they've repaired a pipe like that, then they wouldn't still be doing it now!
     
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