in 1980 I used a product called Micafil - Today I find in may contain asbestos.

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Divided up a large bedroom - wall standard 3 inch sole and verticals - Plaster board - Thin Ply - Polythene sheeting - Central 3 inch gap filled with Micafil - same the other side in reverse.
Absolutely Sound proof. Used as kids bedrooms ever since. Great job, but today I find about 75% of Vermiculite by Libby etc in the USA contains a dangerous form of Asbestos.
Would the UK regulations then in force allowing the bagged sale of this material - I estimate I purchased the equivalent of 10-12 bags x 100litres. At the time it was generally advised not using it on external walls for dampness transmission avoidance.
The internal membrane I put in, as it was a dusty product and could run, has not been compromised by holes or punctures.
What I need to know is, what UK regulations were in force just before 1980 concerning this material Micafil in relation to asbestos. Currently it is on sale on the internet, but this would be under today's regulations.
 
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It's a USA problem, UK Vermiculite (as used in UK gardens too) doesn't come from USA
 
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You will need to ask the manufacturer about how it was made at the time. I'm not sure if Micafil is a trade name or not or a generic reference to processed vermiculite. Either way, unless you the actual packaging, then you won't know.

Vermiculite is itself asbestos free, but the mines it came from may have asbestos fibre excavated at the same time, and it depends what part of the world the material was imported from. The majority of vermiculite came from a single mine where asbestos was mined too, but if not from that mine, it may well be ceertified asbestos-free.

The only way to know for sure is to have it tested under a microscope.

In any case there is some residual respiratory risk from silica or other mineral fibres when working with or disturbing the material.
 
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