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In fencing, what is a lag?

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by DIYalot, 21 Aug 2019.

  1. DIYalot

    DIYalot

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    In fencing, what is a lag? I cannot see anything answering this question when I Google. I assume it's a post. Thanks. Rich
     
  2. DIYalot

    DIYalot

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    A lag must be a post. The reason I bring this up is that on a "Application For Fencing" form issued by the council, it says "Fencing must be of a lag and rail type". Anyone know why the council (landlord of the social housing I live in) would be setting that condition? What is the council seeking to do/achieve by stating that condition? Thanks.
     
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  3. Nige F

    Nige F

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    Maybe because they used to use chestnut/wire type ( in our 50's house's garden) and in fact a boundary can be marked with posts and 2 wires. So they standardise a type - possibly :unsure: Never heard of a lag post - only an old lag, in prison.
     
  4. conny

    conny

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  5. blup

    blup

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    If the term came up on a US website maybe it's a reference to a lag bolt, what the Americans call our coach screw.

    Blup
     
  6. DIYalot

    DIYalot

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    Yes, Amercan usage would seem to say lag is a coach screw. Well, if that is the case, why is my council using an American term I wonder. And what would coach screw (lag) and rail really mean? I'll have to ask building services of my local council. Their condition that a fence must be of the lag and rail type is as clear as mud to me. Unless it's meaning a wooden fence. Or, as has been noted, maybe the fence can only mark the boundary, by wires. Could be I suppose. But, council has not objected to next door's fence which is posts and planks of wood as the rails. But, a wire only fence would be no good for backyard security. And makes a bit of a nonsense of the extra height allowed for a rear fence (1.8 metres).
     
    Last edited: 21 Aug 2019
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Northern dialect?
     
  8. blup

    blup

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    I found an online dialect dictionary which has many different definitions, the most relevant of which referred to the stave of a cask or barrel; a stay for timber work; a crack or split in timber, commonly horse chestnut.

    So that points to a post perhaps typically a chestnut paling type fence.

    The terms derive from west yorkshire so perhaps familiar to builders from that region (?)

    Blup
     
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  9. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Picture the round posts with round horizontal bars - the horizontal bars are the lag's.
    There is not much of it online but look at "lag on pole" fencing.

    Maybe you have to employ some old ex convicts to build the fence? :)
     
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  10. DIYalot

    DIYalot

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    I live in West Yorkshire. I think the author of the form got it wrong when he wrote fencing must be lag and rail type, he/she should have said lag and post type. But, what is the significance of that rule? What principle does it adhere to? I must contact the council, that rule might be out of date anyway. I'm thinking about putting up slotted posts with frames in between. I cannot see why that should be ruled out.
     
    Last edited: 22 Aug 2019
  11. lonner

    lonner

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    I think ive sussed it..

    Lol

     
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