Is this allowed - terraced housing and downpipes

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We have a 1901 terraced house with neighbours on both sides which have been converted to HMOs. The gutters from one of the houses drain into a shared down pipe and to the drain on our side.

About ten years ago the house to the left was converted to become shared housing and a new kitchen was put in on the first floor - the landlord at the time has put all waste water from that kitchen into the shared down pipe. Over the years we’ve had some drainage issues which have been sorted by the water pricier due to the shared drain issue (a blockage and then a complete collapse) - all done to no charge to ourselves but some internal damage with flooding in the basement but nothing too serious. We also had a major leak from that kitchen into our living rooms causing £1000s damage but that went through the insurance. That’s not relevant to this issue but gives an idea why we get a bit concerned about water ingress.

anyway we started to notice the outside wall was wet even though there’s not been any significant amount of rainfall recently. On checking the gutters we noticed that one of the gutters next door was leaking and every time the tenants use their sink etc it was just pouring down the external wall.
I’ve asked the landlord to fix it but he doesn’t seem in a rush so my questions are:

Is it allowed for kitchen waste to go i to a rainwater down pipe/drain?
Are we allowed to remove the pipe going into the downpipe on our property - the though is if it pours onto his front steps I’m sure he’d fix it immediately whilst he’s not bothered about it being on our side
Or is it our responsibility to fix?
 
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We moved from an 1899 built house and the rainwater and kitchen waste went into the same gully. That led to the main drain and the toilet and bath water emptied into that too. In our present 1960's house, the rainwater is separate from all other waste water.
 
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I'd contact environmental health and the water co. Who knows what e.h could uncover ;)
 
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Hi there. They are supposed to be separate I believe because blocking due to build up of waste ( hair , dead skin from bathrooms sinks and ,build up of fats , rice and stuff from kitchens ) soak aways will block and cause flooding .

If by chance you can post a photo It would be better to get an idea of if your neighbour is really taking a liberty But by the sounds of it he is.
 
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Also ,it sounds like the wet wall , would be caused by a cracked pipe or loose push fit bend ,probably flush with the wall or near to it .. that’s why when they empty sink it makes your wall wet
 
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Waste water is not allowed to drain into open hoppers and certainly not normal gutters, simply due to health reasons. Best practice would be into a below ground foul sewer via a stack. If it drains into a ground level gulley it must discharge under the gulley grid not splash all around.
Report to building regs might get a result, but whatever you do it won't be quicker than taking action yourself. If it's causing a nuisance then you can take direct action as reasonable, but it depends how close to the wind you want to sail!
 

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