Is this insulating cover cut too short in these spotlights?

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Hi all.

An electrician came and stated that the inner live and neutral cables should not be seen and they should be covered by either the outside grey cover, or the black box.

There is not enough space for the thickness of all cables. Is this a design flaw from the manufacturer? Also, there is nowhere built in to the black box for the earth cables to connect (they are currently simply cut off), are the earth cables supposed to be taped to the metal bar at the back? What's that for? Thanks.
 
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It's a cheapo, badly designed downlight.
The only viable option with that style of fitting is to put both of the grey cables into a separate junction box with cable grips, L N and E all connected together inside, and have a single piece of flex from that to the black connector box.
The metal bracket should be clipped onto the side of the downlight frame.

Replacing the whole lot with decent downlights is another option.
 
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It's a cheapo, badly designed downlight.
The only viable option with that style of fitting is to put both of the grey cables into a separate junction box with cable grips, L N and E all connected together inside, and have a single piece of flex from that to the black connector box.
The metal bracket should be clipped onto the side of the downlight frame.

Replacing the whole lot with decent downlights is another option.
I thought as much. That'll teach me for buying from B and Q out of convenience.
 
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There is not enough space for the thickness of all cables. Is this a design flaw from the manufacturer?
Unfortunately light fitting designs are very often crap. Manufacturers often either don't seem to know or don't seem to care that a fitting will often be fed by multiple cables.
 
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It's for a kitchen, and I need 9.

Previously, there was only one light in the kitchen

The installer did this circuit (for some reason):

lights.png

Any suggestions for decent downlight fittings if I decided to replace them all please?

Thanks.
 
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Easy solution is to replace those rubbish terminal boxes with these



The earth wire needs sleeving and connecting at each junction and connected to earth at your centre point.


The installer did this circuit (for some reason):
The reason probably was so that he could run the cable along the joist run. It is easier to do that than across the joists where you have to pull up much more floor and drill every joist.

If you want a proper downlight, have a look at the Greenbrook range. But **warning** you’ll need deep pockets!
 
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The Ashley junction box
c699a1_875a2c17e0a84ce98fa8deb1378773e0~mv2.webp
has the same connections as the ceiling rose, and has cable grips, there are others which are also maintenance free, the rules say
411.3.1.1 Protective earthing
Exposed-conductive-parts shall be connected to a protective conductor under the specific conditions for each type
of system earthing as specified in Regulations 411.4 to 411.6.
Simultaneously accessible exposed-conductive-parts shall be connected to the same earthing system individually, in
groups or collectively.
Conductors for protective earthing shall comply with Chapter 54.
A circuit protective conductor shall be run to and terminated at each point in wiring and at each accessory except a
lampholder having no exposed-conductive-parts and suspended from such a point.
So the really if not suspended then there must be an earth wire even if not used, only the wire from ceiling rose to bulb holder can be without an earth wire since 1966 when the rules changed.

The problem is standard ceiling rose is also a junction box taking the supply to the next lamp, so if the earth wire is cut back, it means next lamp also has no earth.

But we have a problem, the standard BA22d bulb has a outer metal connection in the main not used, with the smaller bulb used in cars the shell is used, but not seen it used with the larger bulbs, but it could be, so the bulb needs marking as class II,
60px-Double_insulation_symbol.svg.png
but not seen a single one marked as such, we know they are class II the same as a E27 bulb, but not marked, so some common sense is required. So although the regulations do not allow for the use of these, upload_2021-9-6_10-17-16.png we have to turn a blind eye, these upload_2021-9-6_10-19-6.png however should only be used within an enclosure, and in the past with quartz lamps we would always have an enclosure to protect from the heat, but with LED the heat is reduced.


The big problem is where G5.3 extra low voltage was used, and we want to convert to GU10 low voltage and all the cables can take the 230 volt, but have not got an earth wire.

So what does the inspector do? If he decides it's safe enough due to location and only awards a code C3, next time it is inspected the next inspector may give it a C2, same for electrician installing lamps, if I install lamps not to current BS 7671 regulations, in theory any time in next 10 years until the EICR is done, the owner could come back and say this has never complied please correct FOC.

I see screwfix LAP FastFix GU10 connector Box (126KJ) has a maintenance free box and two connectors for neutral, earth, switched line and line.
 
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