Kitchen lighting help

Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Thought this would be the easy part of our new kitchen!

I thought I wanted downlights for our new kitchen (approx 4m x 4m) as I have been more than happy with our choice in the bathroom. Astro lighting's Vanvouver. Photo attached.
I believe they are now considered to be "the devil's work" (halogen!) and I should go for led.

Having read advice to others on here, where a lot of people seem to say don't use downlights because of shadows, I really don't know what to do. I have Googled until I'm blue in the face to gather enough info to make an informed decision but I'm getting even more confused about halogen, led, transformers or no transformers, warm light, cool light etc etc

On one wall in front of a window we have the sink unit and small work area for cooking prep, beside that on the other wall a row of wall units and a small area under one as a breakfast bar with one seat. The wall opposite has a couple of wall units, the cooker, hob and back door. Cooker extractor will have 2 led lights above hob. The remaining wall has a full size door into an understairs cupboard and door into the hall.

Any suggestions for type and number of lights would be very gratefully received. A very comprehensive website for the lay person explaining it all would be great too. I would like something stylish and that doesn't harbour grease and grime. This is my first brand new kitchen in 21 years! Really can't afford to get this wrong. Thanks for reading this far!
 

Attachments

  • 15307749653631879520943.jpg
    15307749653631879520943.jpg
    98.6 KB · Views: 260
Sponsored Links
Joined
27 Jan 2008
Messages
19,520
Reaction score
1,858
Location
Llanfair Caereinion, Nr Welshpool
Country
United Kingdom
Is the kitchen a work station or place of beauty? The fluescent tube is likely the best light for no shadows and quick and easy fitting, but they don't look so good, so a compromise, over 3W 2" down lights tend to have cooling fins so there is very little spread of light, and at 3W you would likely need 10 or more, surface lights 5" give more spread less light is absorbed into surfaces but it all depends how they look in your kitchen.

With hidden 8W fluorescent under cupboards, and lights in cooker hood you may get away with a single 22W 2D fluorescent on ceiling, but more down to your personal taste than what works best.
 
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Thanks for your reply. I'm rapidly going off downlights! If I went for a 3 spotlight plate with led gu10 bulbs would that be bright enough or would I need 2 x 3? We currently have a 3 spotlight fitting with standard 60w silvered bulbs and some areas of the kitchen are in shadow, particularly when standing by the sink because the fitting is behind me.
This is proving to be the most difficult part of the planning of the kitchen and the one the kitchen company have glossed over somewhat.
 
Joined
4 Nov 2010
Messages
5,912
Reaction score
603
Location
Cumbria
Country
United Kingdom
Yes, under cupboard lights are not a gimmick - it's a good way to light the working surfaces, especially if you've fitted "poor" main room lighting (and yes, I consider small recessed torches to be "poor" for functional lighting). I'm half way through fitting them in our kitchen which is lit by a large array of little torches (previous owner's choice) - not helped by the PO putting the JBs behind the cabinets meaning I have to partially disassemble the cabinets :evil:
I would choose strip lights rather than individual LEDs - the latter give you hard shadows. I've chosen flexible LED strip fitted into an aluminium extrusion with translucent cover - and fitted them about 4" back from the front of the cupboard so they aren't lighting the work surface (and things on it) from behind.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
4 Nov 2010
Messages
5,912
Reaction score
603
Location
Cumbria
Country
United Kingdom
Personally I "would not be happy with it". Again, you are putting in spotlights that will light up whatever 3 areas you point them at - and you are partially acknowledging that by adding additional lighting for areas you don't think it's going to work for.
At Mum's last house, Dad put up two 3 lamp fittings - the idea being that the individual lights could be pointed at specific things like the cooker and hob. Guess what ? By far the most used light in the kitchen - even when using something with a 50W torch pointed at it - was the 100W bulb in a pendant :rolleyes:
 
Joined
27 Aug 2003
Messages
69,757
Reaction score
2,884
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Amelia -what sort of lights do you want?

Hanging down from the ceiling, mounted flush on the ceiling, or recessed into the ceiling?
 
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
I am happy with any of the 3 types you mentioned as long as they are in a simple, contemporary style and easy to keep clean. I would like bright clear lighting, without shadows, preferably daylight or on the cool spectrum.. Not bothered about mood lighting. It's only a small simple kitchen (4m x 4m), nothing fancy. Functional is more important as I enjoy cooking. Thanks for your advice.
 
Joined
4 Nov 2010
Messages
5,912
Reaction score
603
Location
Cumbria
Country
United Kingdom
I am happy with any of the 3 types you mentioned as long as they are in a simple, contemporary style and easy to keep clean. I would like bright clear lighting, without shadows, preferably daylight or on the cool spectrum.. Not bothered about mood lighting. It's only a small simple kitchen (4m x 4m), nothing fancy. Functional is more important as I enjoy cooking.
4m x 4m isn't small. 2m x 2m is small ;)
Baseds on what you've said, then I don't think you'll like downlights - or tiny little torches set into the ceiling.
I'd suggest surface mounted lighting, either round types such as these (in particular, look for those with diffuser visible round the sides) or LED battens such as these. By having a surface mounted fitting, it can shine the light all around and the ceiling will act as a diffuse reflector.
Regardless of what you do install, at least make provision for under-cabinet lights when having the wiring done - then at least you have that option later without ripping things apart. Some people like plinth lights as well (for the aesthetics) - though they don't do anything for me.
 
Joined
27 Aug 2003
Messages
69,757
Reaction score
2,884
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
I am happy with any of the 3 types you mentioned as long as they are in a simple, contemporary style and easy to keep clean.
Well - that helps, but without that I hope you can see how hard it could be to advise:

Hanging down from the ceiling
original-kitchen-hanging-lights-30.jpg


More.


mounted flush on the ceiling
upload_2018-7-9_21-38-42.png



recessed into the ceiling
upload_2018-7-9_21-43-42.png

upload_2018-7-9_21-45-33.png

upload_2018-7-9_21-48-7.png



I would like bright clear lighting, without shadows
Probably best to avoid small point light sources, e.g. typical downlighters. track spotlights etc. Think about the fact that if it might be reasonable to call something a "spotlight", there's a reason for that.


preferably daylight or on the cool spectrum
Colour temperature is largely independent of light style.


Not bothered about mood lighting. It's only a small simple kitchen (4m x 4m), nothing fancy. Functional is more important as I enjoy cooking.
Seriously - don't dismiss the idea of lights under your wall cupboards shining down onto the worktops. LED strips can provide nice, even lighting.

And don't dismiss the idea of being able to change the colour or brightness of those lights - depending on what natural lighting you have you might find that in "daylight" hours you want different artificial lighting to when it is dark. Or when you come down in the night to get a drink.

Do dismiss the ideas of anybody who pops up here telling you not to have a dimmer switch in a kitchen because you won't be capable of using it and will cut your fingers because the light is too dim.
 
Joined
15 Nov 2015
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
Thank you for your detailed post. Kind of you to take the trouble and offer such helpful advice. I have decided to ditch the downlights idea having just stayed at a hotel for a few days. The en suite bathroom was large (not much smaller than my kitchen) and was lit using so many downlights I gave up counting. I hadn't seen your post until just now but have just ordered 3 pendant lights from John Lewis (an extra one for the small hallway next to the kitchen). Thought I'd try the hall one first to see whether it's going to be suitable. Will post again with my decision - it might help someone else. Thanks again.
 
Joined
4 Nov 2010
Messages
5,912
Reaction score
603
Location
Cumbria
Country
United Kingdom
I have decided to ditch the downlights idea having just stayed at a hotel for a few days. The en suite bathroom was large (not much smaller than my kitchen) and was lit using so many downlights I gave up counting.
So you've seen for yourself how they are great for "looking good" but have "poor" efficacy for actually lighting the room and stuff you want to use/do :whistle: I can't help thinking they are often specified by "architects" who don't have to live there.
Having said that, our kitchen was improved quite a lot by fitting different LED "bulbs" (ones with a single central emitter) allowing both a wider spread and allowing more light to escape the fitting - but even with a dozen of the damn things, still not half as good as a couple of LED battens (flouro tube replacements) or about 3off 10W surface mount round fittings would be.
 
Sponsored Links
Top